dignity

A Quote by Robert C. Winthrop on dignity, education, ignorance, justice, safety, slavery, and welfare

Slavery is but half abolished, emancipation is but half completed, while millions of freemen with votes in their hands are left without education. Justice to them, the welfare of the States in which they live, the safety of the whole Republic, the dignity of the elective franchise, - all alike demand that the still remaining bonds of ignorance shall be unloosed and broken, and the minds as well as the bodies of the emancipated go free.

Robert C. Winthrop (1809 - 1894)

Source: Yorktown Oration in 1881.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Wagner on beginning, dignity, and pity

Human dignity begins to assert itself only at the point where man is distinguishable from the beast by pity for it.

Richard Wagner (1813 - 1883)

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A Quote by Richard Phillips Feynman on blindness, dignity, habits, ideas, order, science, work, worry, and writing

We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn't any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to get to do the work.

Richard Feynman (1918 - 1988)

Source: Nobel Lecture, 1966.

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A Quote by Raymond B. Fosdick, D.D. on clothes, desires, dignity, environment, force, hope, knowledge, life, meaning, men, purpose, spirit, and truth

The search for truth is, as it always has been, the noblest expression of the human spirit. Man's insatiable desire for knowledge about himself, about his environment and the forces by which he is surrounded, gives life its meaning and purpose, and clothes it with final dignity.... And yet we know, deep in our hearts, that knowledge is not enough.... Unless we can anchor our knowledge to moral purposes, the ultimate result will be dust and ashes- dust and ashes that will bury the hopes and monuments of men beyond recovery.

Raymond B. Fosdick (1878 - 1979)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on character, dignity, force, good, learning, and wit

No dignity, no learning, no force of character, can make any stand against good wit.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on action, beginning, citizenship, dignity, joy, labor, learning, limitations, necessity, observation, popularity, sacrifice, society, virtue, and work

I hear therefore with joy whatever is beginning to be said of the dignity and necessity of labor to every citizen. There is virtue yet in the hoe and the spade, for learned as well as for unlearned hands. And labor is everywhere welcome; always we are invited to work; only be this limitation observed, that a man shall not for the sake of wider activity sacrifice any opinion to the popular judgments and modes of action. An Oration delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, at Cambridge, August 31, 1837.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: “The American Scholar” from “Addresses,” published as part of Nature; Addresses and Lectures

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A Quote by Ralph Cordiner on company, dignity, and risk

When it's over it should be over. When a man is no longer at risk, he loses touch. I think these fellows who think they have some long-term right to dignity and salary and expense accounts and company planes are all wrong. On December 21, 1963 I walked out of there and said that's it: no office, no secretaries. Nothing.

Ralph Cordiner

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A Quote by R. C. Samsel on character, dignity, disappointment, effort, justice, reputation, respect, and weakness

Character is the foundation stone upon which one must build to win respect. just as no worthy building can be erected on a weak foundation, so no lasting reputation worthy of respect can be built on a weak character. Without character, all effort to attain dignity is superficial, and results are sure to be disappointing.

R. C. Samsel

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A Quote by Price Pritchett, Ph.D. on decisions, dignity, ethics, excellence, pride, respect, self-respect, and vanity

Live according to the ethics of excellence, and you can always stand proud. Pride - not vanity, but dignity and self-respect - should carry a lot of weight in helping you make decisions. Let pride help you decide.

Price Pritchett

Source: The Ethics of Excellence

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A Quote by Cal Thomas on acceptance, america, audiences, babies, blindness, boldness, children, concern, country, criticism, death, decisions, dignity, generosity, good, heart, hunger, inclusion, life, love, motherhood, murder, nations, nobility, peace,

Mother Teresa Has Anti-Abortion Answer At a National Prayer Breakfast in Washington Feb. 3, Mother Teresa of Calcutta delivered the most startling and bold proclamation of truth to power I have heard in my more than 30 professional years in Washington. Before an audience of 3,000 - that included the president and his wife, the vice president and his wife and congressional leaders, among others - the 83-year old nun, who is physically frail but spiritually and rhetorically powerful, delivered an address that cut to the heart of the social ills afflicting America. She said that America, once known for generosity to the world, has become selfish. And she said that the greatest proof of that selfishness is abortion. Tying abortion to growing violence and murder in the streets, she said, "If we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill each other? . . . Any country that accepts abortion is not teaching its people to love, but to use any violence to get what they want." At that line, most of those in attendance erupted in a standing ovation, something that rarely occurs at these sedate events. At that moment, President Clinton quickly reached for his water glass, and Mrs. Clinton and Vice President and Mrs. Gore stared without expression at Mother Teresa. They did not applaud. It was clearly an uncomfortable moment on the dais. She then delivered the knockout punch: "Many people are very, very concerned with children in India, with the children of Africa where quite a few die of hunger, and so on. Many people are also concerned about all the violence in this great country of the United States. "These concerns are very good. But often these same people are not concerned with the millions who are being killed by the deliberate decision of their own mothers. And this is what is the greatest destroyer of peace today - abortion, which brings people to such blindness." What? Abortion destroys peace and causes blindness toward the sick, the hungry and the naked? Abortion leads to wars between nations? Of course it does, if life is regarded so lightly and its disposal becomes so trivial, so clinical and so easy. Why should people or nations regard human life as noble or dignified if abortion flourishes? Why agonize about indiscriminate death in Bosnia when babies are being killed far more efficiently and out of the sight of television cameras? Mother Teresa delivered her address without rhetorical flourishes. She never raised her voice or pounded the lectern. Her power was in her words and the selfless life she has led. Even President Clinton, in his remarks that followed, acknowledged she was beyond criticism because of the life she has lived in service to others. At the end, she pleaded for pregnant women who don't want their children to give them to her: "I am willing to accept any child who would be aborted and to give that child to a married couple who will love the child and be loved by the child." She said she has placed over 3,000 children in adoptive homes from her Calcutta headquarters alone. She has answered the question, "Who will care for all of these babies if abortion is again outlawed?" Now the question is whether a woman contemplating abortion wishes to be selfish or selfless, to take life or to give life.

Cal Thomas

Source: Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Salt Lake Tribune, Feb. 14, 1994

Contributed by: Zaady

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