diet

A Quote by Bette Davis on dream, fulfillment, labor, life, and diet

To fulfill a dream, to be allowed to seat over lonely labor, to be given the chance to create, is the meat and potatoes of life. The money is the gravy. As everyone else, I love to dunk my crust in it. But alone, it is not a diet designed to keep body and soul together.

Bette Davis (1908 - 1989)

Source: The Lonely Life, 1962

Contributed by: bajarbattu

A Quote by Edward Paul Abbey on diet, eating, raw food, raw, veganism, vegetarianism, spirituality, and obsession

Nobody seems more obsessed by diet than our anti-materialist, otherworldly, New Age, spiritual types.  But if the material world is merely illusion, an honest guru should be as content with Budweiser and bratwurst as with raw carrot juice, tofu, and seaweed slime.

Edward Abbey (1927 - 1989)

Source: A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto): Notes from a Secret Journal, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Joseph Pizzorno N.D. on dieting, diet, cabbage, and fad diet

Too much of anything, no matter how healthful, can cause an imbalance.

Joseph Pizzorno

Source: Total Wellness

Contributed by: J~E~S~S

A Quote by Michael Pollan on eating disorder, food, food supply, diets, diet, and health

I N T RODUCTION

OUR NATIONAL EATING DISORDERSR

What should we have for dinner?

This book is a long and fairly involved answer to this seemingly simple question. Along the way, it also tries to figure out how such a simple question could ever have gotten so complicated. As a culture we seem to have arrived at a place where whatever native wisdom we may once have possessed about eating has been replaced by confusion and anxiety. Somehow this most elemental of activities—figuring out what to eat—has come to require a remarkable amount of expert help. How did we ever get to a point where we need investigative journalists to tell us where our food comes from and nutritionists to determine the dinner menu?

For me the absurdity of the situation became inescapable in the fall of 2002, when one of the most ancient and venerable staples of human life abruptly disappeared from the American dinner table. I’m talking of course about bread. Virtually overnight, Americans changed the way the way they eat. A collective spasm of what can only be described as carbophobia seized the country, supplanting an era of national lipophobia dating to the Carter administration. The latter was when, in 1977, a Senate committee had issued a set of “dietary goals” warning beefloving Americans to lay off the red meat. And so we dutifully had, until now.

What set off the sea change? It appears to have been a perfect media storm of diet books, scientific studies, and one timely magazine article.  The new diet books, many of them inspired by the formerly discredited Dr. Robert C. Atkins, brought Americans the welcome news that they could eat more meat and lose weight just so long as they laid off the bread and pasta. These high-protein, low-carb diets found support in a handful of new epidemiological studies suggesting that the nutritional orthodoxy that had held sway in America since the 1970s might be wrong. It was not, as official opinion claimed, fat that made us fat, but the carbohydrates we’d been eating precisely in order to stay slim. So conditions were ripe for a swing of the dietary pendulum when, in the summer of 2002, the New York Times Magazine published a cover story on the new research entitled “What if Fat Doesn’t Make You Fat?”  Within months, supermarket shelves were restocked and menus rewritten to reflect the new nutritional wisdom.  The blamelessness of steak restored, two of the most wholesome and uncontroversial foods known to man—bread and pasta—acquired a moral stain that promptly bankrupted dozens of bakeries and noodle firms and ruined an untold number of perfectly good meals.

So violent a change in a culture’s eating habits is surely the sign of a national eating disorder. Certainly it would never have happened in a culture in possession of deeply rooted traditions surrounding food and eating. But then, such a culture would not feel the need for its most august legislative body to ever deliberate the nation’s “dietary goals”—or, for that matter, to wage political battle every few years over the precise design of an official government graphic called the “food pyramid.” A country with a stable culture of food would not shell out millions for the quackery (or common sense) of a new diet book every January. It would not be susceptible to the pendulum swings of food scares or fads, to the apotheosis every few years of one newly discovered nutrient and the demonization of another. It would not be apt to confuse protein bars or food supplements with meals or breakfast cereals with

medicines. It probably would not eat a fifth of its meals in cars or feed fully a third of its children at a fast-food outlet every day. And it surely would not be nearly so fat.

Nor would such a culture be shocked to discover that there are other countries, such as Italy and France, that decide their dinner questions on the basis of such quaint and unscientific criteria as pleasure and tradition, eat all manner of “unhealthy” foods, and, lo and behold, wind up actually healthier and happier in their eating than we are.  We show our surprise at this by speaking of something called the “French paradox,” for how could a people who eat such demonstrably toxic substances as foie gras and triple crème cheese actually be slimmer and healthier than we are? Yet I wonder if it doesn’t make more sense to speak in terms of an American paradox—that is, a notably unhealthy people obsessed by the idea of eating healthily.

Michael Pollan

Source: The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (Large Print Press), Pages: intro

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by unknown on love, life, living large, health, wellness, spirituality, forgiveness, creativity, diet, books, fun, laughter, and friendship

All is forgiven, move on.

unknown

Source: Our Lady of Weight Loss: Miraculous and Motivaitonal Musings from the Patron Saint of Permanent Fat removal

Contributed by: OurLadyofWeightLoss

A Quote by Sol Luckman on habit, addiction, ritual, highlight, candy, food, decadence, civilization, fruitless, deprivation, cult, rules, laws, and diet

From that point on I visited the bottle every day at dusk. After the morning with Alexis and the afternoon in the sun, this became the third highlight of my day. I never ate more than a milk ball or two and at most half a licorice twist. It was the ritual that counted, the decadent taste of civilization in that strange fruitless Eden where I was allowed to eat practically anything, so long as it wasn’t food.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 51

Contributed by: Leigh

A Quote by Sol Luckman on vedic, yoga, meditation, diet, higher-dimensional, energy, bioenergy, prana, taoist, chi, tesla, scalar, bearden, distance healing, free electricity, reich, orgone, aether, ether, light, torsion energy, holographic, hologram, an

The Vedics created an elaborate science spanning yoga, meditation and diet for pooling this higher-dimensional energy, which they termed “prana,” into their bodies. The Taoists developed a similar science for cultivating “chi.” Early in the 20th Century, Nikola Tesla theorized the existence of “scalar” waves (subsequently popularized by Tom Bearden) that transcend spatial limitations and are capable of acting instantaneously at a distance. Tesla created a prototype scalar system for free electricity using no generators or wires. Later, Wilhelm Reich became famous experimenting with “orgone” energy. Aether, prana, chi, scalar, orgone—all are names for the light-based aspect of the same spiritual or torsion energy that gave (and continues to give) rise to the holographic multiverse.

Sol Luckman

Source: Conscious Healing: Book One on the Regenetics Method, Pages: 65..66

Contributed by: Leigh

A Quote by Albert Einstein on diet, health, survival, and vegetarianism

Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Pascal Imperato on vegetarian and diet

The National Dairy Council, with the government's permission, (is still) the largest and most important provider of nutrition education in the country... That the Diary Council can still convincingly promote saturated fat and cholesterol-rich diets reflects ... the credibility it built in the days before the link between these elements and atherosclerosis was known.  [Dr. Pascal Imperato from New York is who John is quoting here.]

Pascal Imperato

Source: Diet for a New America: How Your Food Choices Affect Your Health, Happiness and the Future of Life on Earth, Pages: 229

Contributed by: bobJuan

A Quote by Henry Wheeler Shaw on diet, bowels, and brains

A good reliable set of bowels is worth more to a man than any quantity of brains.

Henry Wheeler Shaw

Source: Diet for a New America: How Your Food Choices Affect Your Health, Happiness and the Future of Life on Earth, Pages: 284

Contributed by: bobJuan

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