devil

A Quote by Laurence Sterne on devil and world

Go, poor devil, get thee gone! Why should I hurt thee? This world surely is wide enough to hold both thee and me.

Laurence Sterne (1713 - 1768)

Source: Tristram Shandy (orig. ed.). Vol. ii. chap. xii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kara Vichko on devil and kindness

These days, the wages of sin depend on what kind of deal you make with the devil.

Kara Vichko

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on affliction, blindness, devil, and justice

Remember, one just man causes the Devil greater affliction than a million blind believers.

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: Wisdom of Gibran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on affection, angels, beauty, devil, emptiness, knowledge, life, and spirit

He who does not see the angels and devils in the beauty and malice of life will be far removed from knowledge, and his spirit will be empty of affection.

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: Wisdom of Gibran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jonathan Winters on devil and god

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God is in my head, but the devil is in my pants.

Jonathan Winters

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jonathan Edwards on devil and humility

Nothing sets a person so much out of the devils reach as humility.

Jonathan Edwards (1703 - 1758)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Smith on books, daughters, death, devil, friendship, history, imagination, popularity, and salvation

In 1617, a new edition of Smith's True Relation went into print, in which the Pocahontas episode was appended as a sequence of footnotes to the narrative of Smith's captivity under Powhatan. Six years later, the story of Smith's salvation, now quite colorfully detailed, was incorporated into an extensively amended reprint of Symond's Proceedings, published as Book III of Smith's own history of Virginia. Since then, the tale has been firmly fixed in the popular imagination. "At last they brought him [Smith] to Meronocomoco, where was Powhatan their Emperor. ...[H]aving feasted him after their best barbarous manner they could, a long consultation was held, but the conclusion was, two great stones were brought before Powhatan : then as many as could layd hands on him, dragged him to them, and thereon laid his head, and being ready with their clubs, to beate out his braines, Pocahontas the kings dearest daughter, when no intreaty could prevaile, got his head in her armes, and laid her own upon his to save him from death: whereat the Emperour was contented he should live to make him hatchets, and her bells, beads, and copper... Two days after, Powhatan having disguised himselfe in the most fearfullest manner he could, caused Captaine Smith to be brought forth to great house in the woods... [T]hen Powhatan more like a devil then a man with some two hundred more as blacke as himselfe, came unto him and told him now they were friends, and presently he should goe to James towne..."

John Smith (1580 - 1631)

Source: The Generall History of Virginia, 1623

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Randolph of Roanoke on benevolence, devil, equality, independence, interest, liberty, love, men, needs, power, principles, religion, selfishness, and trying

The principle of liberty and equality, if coupled with mere selfishness, will make men only devils, each trying to be independent that he may fight only for his own interest. And here is the need of religion and its power, to bring in the principle of benevolence and love to men.

John Randolph (1773 - 1833)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on devil and hell

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The other shape, If shape it might be call'd that shape had none Distinguishable in member, joint, or limb; Or substance might be call'd that shadow seem'd, For each seem'd either,--black it stood as night, Fierce as ten furies, terrible as hell, And shook a dreadful dart; what seem'd his head The likeness of a kingly crown had on. Satan was now at hand.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 666.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on devil and heaven

Satan; so call him now, his former name Is heard no more in heaven.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book v. Line 658.

Contributed by: Zaady

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