destruction

A Quote by Ayn Rand on chance, destruction, kindness, mountains, world, and path

Yes . . . Yes, I feel that there's no chance for me to exist, if they do . . . no chance, no room, no world I can cope with. . . . I don't want to feel it, I keep pushing it back, but it's coming closer and I know I have no place to run. . . . I can't explain what it feels like, I can't catch hold of it - and that's path of the terror, that you can't catch hold of anything - it's as if the whole world were suddenly destroyed, but not by an explosion - an explosion is something hard and solid - but destroyed by . . . by some horrible kind of softening . . . as if nothing were solid, nothing held any shape at all, and you could poke your finger through stone walls and the stone would give, like jelly, and mountains would slither, and buildings would switch their shapes like clouds - and that would be the end of the world, not fire and brimstone, but goo.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: Atlas Shrugged

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Asa Philip Randolph on destruction, expectation, and truth

In every truth, the beneficiaries of a system cannot be expected to destroy it.

Asa Philip Randolph (1889 - 1979)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Koestler on culture, destruction, habits, history, names, order, society, study, universe, and vision

In the index to the six hundred odd pages of Arnold Toynbee's A Study of History, abridged version, the names of Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes and Newton do not occur yet their cosmic quest destroyed the medieval vision of an immutable social order in a walled-in universe and transformed the European landscape, society, culture, habits and general outlook, as thoroughly as if a new species had arisen on this planet.

Arthur Koestler (1905 - 1983)

Source: G. Simmons Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill Inc., 1992.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Art Berg on body, day, destruction, earth, emotion, failure, faith, family, friendship, god, health, jobs, pain, spirituality, suffering, and wealth

Centuries earlier, Job suffered immeasurable losses. His wealth was stripped from him; his family destroyed. Finally, after all else was gone, he was stricken with boils and failing health. Every day and every hour he suffered physical, emotional, and spiritual pain. His friends mocked him, but Job remained faithful. He emphatically declared, For I know that my redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth: And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh I shall see God. (Job 19: 25-26.)

Art Berg

Source: Art Berg in Some miracles take time

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on affection, destruction, and habits

Dissimilarity of habit tends more than anything to destroy affection.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ann Landers on destruction

Hate is like acid. It can damage the vessel in which it is stored as well as destroy the object on which it is poured.

Ann Landers (1918 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Andrew Hamilton on destruction and power

Power may justly be compared to a great river; while kept within it bounds it is both beautiful and useful, but when it overflows its banks, it is then too impetuous to be stemmed; it bears down all before it, and brings destruction and desolation wherever it comes.

Andrew Hamilton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on belief, destruction, and virtue

RUIN, v. To destroy. Specifically, to destroy a maid's belief in the virtue of maids.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on destruction and present

K, n. A consonant; originally precisely that of our H, but altered to its present shape to commemorate the destruction of [one of two lofty columns in] the great temple of Jarute.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on destruction

INTIMACY, n. A relation into which fools are providentially drawn for their mutual destruction.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

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