despair

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on despair, feeling, hope, mind, society, and war

My views and feelings (are) in favor of the abolition of war - and I hope it is practicable, by improving the mind and morals of society, to lessen the disposition to war; but of its abolition I despair.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on despair, hope, idleness, and work

There is a perennial nobleness, and even sacredness, in work. Were he never so benighted, forgetful of his high calling, there is always hope in a man that actually and earnestly works: in idleness alone there is perpetual despair.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on ability, art, colors, despair, doubt, envy, execution, imagination, losing, nature, and skill

A story is told that Whistler once painted a tiny picture of a spray of roses. The artistry involved in the picture was magnificent. Never before, it seemed, had the art of man been able to execute quite so deftly a reproduction of the art of nature. The picture was the envy of the artists who saw it, the despair of the collectors who yearned to buy it. But Whistler refused steadfastly to sell it. "For," he said, "whenever I feel that my hand has lost its cunning, whenever I doubt my ability, I look at the little picture of the spray of roses, and say to myself, 'Whistler, you painted that. Your hand drew it. Your imagination conceived the colors. Your skill put the roses on the canvas.' Then, said he, "I know that what I have done, I can do again"

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: Told by Sterling W. Sill in Majesty of Books, p. 128

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, good, listening, and weakness

To despair over one's sins indicates that sin has become or wants to be internally consistent. It wants nothing to do with the good, does not want to be so weak as to listen occasionally to other talk. No, it insists on listening only to itself, on having dealings only with itself; it closes itself up within itself, indeed, locks itself inside one more inclosure, and protects itself against every attack or pursuit by the good by despairing over sin.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, devil, and spirit

The ever increasing intensity of despair depends upon the degree of consciousness or is proportionate to this increase: the greater the degree of consciousness, the more intensive the despair. This is everywhere apparent, most clearly in despair at its maximum and minimum. The devil's despair is the most intensive despair, for the devil is sheer spirit and hence unqualified consciousness and transparency; there is no obscurity in the devil that could serve as a mitigating excuse. Therefore, his despair is the most absolute defiance. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, despair, facts, ignorance, individuality, spirit, and truth

Compared with the person who is conscious of his despair, the despairing individual who is ignorant of his despair is simply a negativity further away from the truth and deliverance. . . . Yet ignorance is so far from breaking the despair or changing despair to nondespairing that it can in fact be the most dangerous form of despair. . . . An individual is furthest from being conscious of himself as spirit when he is ignorant of being in despair. But precisely this-not to be conscious of oneself as spirit-is despair, which is spiritlessness. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, god, lawyers, and weakness

Sin is: before God, or with the conception of God, in despair not to will to be oneself, or in despair to will to be oneself. Thus sin is intensified weakness or intensified defiance: sin is the intensification of despair. The emphasis is on before God, or with a conception of God; it is the conception of God that makes sin dialectically, ethically, and religiously what lawyers call 'aggravated' despair.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair and individuality

An individual in despair despairs over something. . . . In despairing over something, he really despair[s] over himself, and now he wants to get rid of himself. Consequently, to despair over something is still not despair proper. . . . To despair over oneself, in despair to will to be rid of oneself-this is the formula for all despair.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, death, despair, hope, and life

So to be sick unto death is, not to be able to die-yet not as though there were hope of life; no, the hopelessness in this case is that even the last hope, death, is not available. When death is the greatest danger, one hopes for life; but when one becomes acquainted with an even more dreadful danger, one hopes for death. So when the danger is so great that death has become one's hope, despair is the disconsolateness of not being able to die.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

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A Quote by Sir William Osler on adversity, courage, danger, despair, disappointment, failure, idealism, life, patience, principles, and superiority

Be calm and strong and patient. Meet failure and disappointment with courage. Rise superior to the trials of life, and never give in to hopelessness or despair. In danger, in adversity, cling to your principles and ideals. Aequanimitas!

Sir William Osler (1849 - 1919)

Contributed by: Zaady

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