dependence

A Quote by Henry C. Link on adulthood, age, children, dependence, and people

Psychologically I should say that a person becomes an adult at the point when he produces more than he consumes or earns more than he spends. This may be at the age of eighteen, twenty-five, or thirty-five. Some people remain unproductive and dependent children forever and therefore intellectually and emotionally immature.

Henry C. Link

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by H. A. Hopf on acceptance, action, business, decisions, dependence, facts, habits, indecision, responsibility, and risk

Indecision is debilitating; it feeds upon itself; it is, one might almost say, habit-forming. Not only that, but it is contagious; it transmits itself to others. . . . Business is dependent upon action. It cannot go forward by hesitation. Those in executive positions must fortify themselves with facts and accept responsibility for decisions based upon them. Often greater risk is involved in postponement than in making a wrong decision.

H. A. Hopf

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George R. Kirkpatrick on dependence, failure, men, nature, and success

Nature gave men two ends - one to sit on and one to think with. Ever since then man's success or failure has been dependent on the one he used most.

George R. Kirkpatrick

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on dependence, good, life, rest, and world

. . . for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: The last line of Middlemarch, bk. 8, "Finale," 1871.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Freeman Dyson on animals, cities, civilization, climate, consequences, darkness, dependence, good, greatness, history, horses, ideas, inventions, life, motives, needs, power, simplicity, technology, and theory

The technologies which have had the most profound effects on human life are usually simple. A good example of a simple technology with profound historical consequences is hay. Nobody knows who invented hay, the idea of cutting grass in the autumn and storing it in large enough quantities to keep horses and cows alive through the winter. All we know is that the technology of hay was unknown to the Roman Empire but was known to every village of medieval Europe. Like many other crucially important technologies, hay emerged anonymously during the so-called Dark Ages. According to the Hay Theory of History, the invention of hay was the decisive event which moved the center of gravity of urban civilization from the Mediterranean basin to Northern and Western Europe. The Roman Empire did not need hay because in a Mediterranean climate the grass grows well enough in winter for animals to graze. North of the Alps, great cities dependent on horses and oxen for motive power could not exist without hay. So it was hay that allowed populations to grow and civilizations to flourish among the forests of Northern Europe. Hay moved the greatness of Rome to Paris and London, and later to Berlin and Moscow and New York.

Freeman Dyson

Source: Freeman Dyson Infinite in All Directions, Harper and Row, New York, 1988, p 135.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Fred Allen on achievement, dependence, goals, love, privacy, sharing, support, and world

It is probably not love that makes the world go around, but rather those mutually supportive alliances through which partners recognize their dependence on each other for the achievement of shared and private goals.

Fred Allen (1894 - 1956)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine L. Jack on dependence, possessions, and value

The gospel assures you that your value is not dependent on your looks or material possessions.

Elaine L. Jack

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

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A Quote by E. Parmalee Prentice on dependence, earth, facts, history, inclusion, labor, progress, time, and understanding

If anyone wants to understand the course of man on earth, he must consider the fact of the long pause, three million years on the level of savagery, ten thousand years on the level of dependence on the fruits of hand labor, and a hundred or a hundred and fifty years of sudden sharp rise. One hundred or 150 years is the time included in what we call progress in man's history.

E. Parmalee Prentice

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Donald F. Baillie on dependence, destruction, god, humanity, jesus, life, personality, and personality

Jesus lived His life in complete dependence upon God, as we all ought to live our lives. But such dependence does not destroy human personality. Man is never so fully and so truly personal as when he is living in complete dependence upon God. This is how personality comes into its own. This is humanity at its most personal.

Donald F. Baillie

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Daniel Webster on country, day, dedication, dependence, feeling, glory, god, gratitude, heaven, liberty, play, and wishes

We wish that this column, rising towards heaven among the pointed spires of so many temples dedicated to God, may contribute also to produce in all minds a pious feeling of dependence and gratitude. We wish, finally, that the last object to the sight of him who leaves his native shore, and the first to gladden his who revisits it, may be something which shall remind him of the liberty and the glory of his country. Let it rise! let it rise, till it meet the sun in his coming; let the earliest light of the morning gild it, and the parting day linger and play on its summit!

Daniel Webster (1782 - 1852)

Source: At Corner-Stone laying of the Bunker Hill Monument, 1825. Webster's Works. Boston.

Contributed by: Zaady

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