departure

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on departure, immortality, and worth

Fair Greece! sad relic of departed worth! Immortal, though no more! though fallen, great!

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto ii. Stanza 73.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Updike on birds and departure

The stripped and shapely Maple grieves The ghosts of her Departed leaves. The ground is hard, As hard as stone. The year is old, The birds are flown.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on departure, life, and time

It can be said of him, when he departed he took a Man's life with him. No sounder piece of British manhood was put together in that eighteenth century of Time.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Sir Walter Scott. London and Westminster Review, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Russell Lowell on death, departure, fate, friendship, journeys, life, and nature

But life is sweet, though all that makes it sweet Lessen like sound of friends' departing feet; And Death is beautiful as feet of friend Coming with welcome at our journey's end. For me Fate gave, whate'er she else denied, A nature sloping to the southern side; I thank her for it, though when clouds arise Such natures double-darken gloomy skies.

James Lowell (1819 - 1891)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ivor Thomas on art, departure, giving, glory, mind, and wisdom

If thou art able, O stranger, to find out all these things and gather them together in your mind, giving all the relations, thou shalt depart crowned with glory and knowing that thou hast been adjudged perfect in this species of wisdom.

Ivor Thomas

Source: Ivor Thomas "Greek Mathematics" in J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on departure, dreams, eternity, facts, god, imagination, perception, reason, understanding, and universe

Questioner: How do you know God? Abu Asa'id al-Kharraz: By the fact that He is the coincidentia oppositorum. Corbin's commentary: . . . the entire universe of worlds is at once He and not-He (huwa la huwa). The God manifested in forms is at once Himself and other than Himself, for since He is manifested, He is the limited which has no limit, the visible which cannot be seen. This manifestation is neither perceptible nor verifiable by the sensory faculties; discursive reason rejects it. It is perceptible only by the Active Imagination (Hadrat al-Khayal...) at times when it dominates man's sense perceptions, in dreams or better still in the waking state (in the state characteristic of the gnostic when he departs from the consciousness of sensuous things). In short, a mystic perception (dhawq) is required. To perceive all forms as epiphanic forms (mazahir), that is, to perceive through the figures which they manifest and which are the eternal hexeities, that they are other than the Creator and nevertheless that they are He, is precisely to effect the encounter, the coincidence, between God's descent toward the creature and the creature's ascent toward the Creator. The "place" of this encounter is not outside the Creator-Creature totality, but is the area within it which corresponds specifically to the Active Imagination, in the manner of a bridge joining the two banks of a river. The crossing itself is essentially a hermeneutics of symbols, a method of understanding which transmutes sensory data and rational concepts into symbols (mazahir) by making them effect this crossing.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 188-189

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by I Ching on awareness, certainty, change, departure, evil, happiness, men, and peace

Change is certain. Peace is followed by disturbances; departure of evil men by their return. Such recurrences should not constitute occasions for sadness but realities for awareness, so that one may be happy in the interim.

I Ching

Source: the I Ching

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by H. L. Mencken on departure, forgiveness, and thought

If, after I depart this vale, you ever remember me and have thought to please my ghost, forgive some sinner and wink your eye at some homely girl.

H.L. Mencken (1880 - 1956)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on art, bravery, brothers, death, departure, dreams, emptiness, fate, funerals, future, goals, god, heart, learning, life, men, past, soul, present, time, and trust

Tell me not, in mournful numbers, Life is but an empty dream! For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem. Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal; Dust thou art, to dust returnest, Was not spoken of the soul. . . . Art is long, and Time is fleeting, And our hearts, though stout and brave, Still, like muffled drums, are beating Funeral marches to the grave. . . . Trust no Future, howe'er pleasant! Let the dead Past bury its dead! Act,-act in the living Present! Heart within, and God o'erhead! . . . Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time. Footprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again. Let us, then, be up and doing, With a heart for any fate; Still achieving, still pursuing, Learn to labour and to wait.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Source: A Psalm of Life

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on departure, life, men, and time

A Psalm of Life. Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

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