deed

A Quote by Prophet Muhammad on deed, evil, and secrets

If you disclose your alms, even then it is well done, but if you keep them secret, and give them to the poor, then that is better still for you; and this wipes off from you some of your evil deeds.

Muhammad (570 - 632)

Source: Koran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Prophet Muhammad on angels, deed, good, and people

When he dies, people will say, "What property has he left behind him?" But the angels will ask, "What good deeds has he sent before him?"

Muhammad (570 - 632)

Source: Koran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Prophet Muhammad on blessings, deed, earth, evil, forgiveness, god, good, and reward

He who does a good deed will have ten times the amount of blessings, and I [God] shall give more, but he who does an evil deed will have an equivalent reward of evil, or I shall grant forgiveness. If anyone draws the length of a span near Me, I shall draw the length of a cubit near him, and if anyone draws the length of a cubit near Me, I shall draw the length of a fathom near him. If anyone comes to Me walking I shall come to him at a run, and if anyone meets me with sins of the size of the earth, but has not associated anything with Me, I shall meet him a similar amount of forgiveness.

Muhammad (570 - 632)

Source: Sayings of Muhammad. by Prof. Ghazi Ahmad

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Prophet Muhammad on deed, envy, good, and justice

Avoid envy, for envy devours good deeds just as fire devours fuel.

Muhammad (570 - 632)

Source: Sayings of Muhammad. by Prof. Ghazi Ahmad

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Prophet Muhammad on deed, evil, faith, good, heart, and peace

What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs (the peace of) your heart, give it up.

Muhammad (570 - 632)

Source: Sayings of Muhammad. by Prof. Ghazi Ahmad

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Prophet Muhammad on blindness, brothers, charity, deed, giving, virtue, and water

Your smiling in your brother's face is charity; an exhortation of your fellow man to virtuous deeds is equal to almsgiving, your putting a wanderer in the right road is charity, your assisting the blind is charity; your removing stones and thorns and other obstructions from the road is charity; your giving water to the thirsty is charity.

Muhammad (570 - 632)

Source: Koran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Meister Eckhart on deed, evil, failure, god, good, men, power, sorrow, work, and world

Even though I never did an evil deed, yet, if I have the will to do evil, I have the sin as if I had done the deed; and I could, by a total will, do as great a sin as if I had killed the whole world, though I never actually did anything. Why, would the same not be possible to a good will? Yes, indeed, and even much more so. Surely, I can do all things with the will. I can bear the sorrow of all men and feed all the poor and do the work of all men and whatever else you may think of. If it be not the will that fails you, but only the power, then truly, before God, you have done it all, and no man can take it from you or even hinder you for a moment; for to will to do as soon as I can is the same before God as having done it.

Meister Eckhart (c.1260 - c.1327)

Source: Spiritual Instructions

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Henry on day and deed

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The better day, the worse deed.

Matthew Henry (1662 - 1714)

Source: Commentaries, Genesis iii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on deed, heaven, and life

Thou waitest for the spark from heaven! and we, Light half-believers in our casual deeds . . . Who hesitate and falter life away, And lose tomorrow the ground won today- Ah, do not we, Wanderer, await it too?

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: The Scholar-Gypsy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on dance, deed, poetry, and thought

A lady with whom I was riding in the forest said to me that the woods always seemed to her to wait, as if the genii who inhabit them suspended their deeds until the wayfarer had passed onward; a thought which poetry has celebrated in the dance of the fairies, which breaks off on the approach of human feet.

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

Contributed by: Zaady

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