deed

A Quote by Charles Reade on day, deed, earth, men, men and women, nobility, suffering, women, and words

Not a day passes over the earth, but men and women of no note do great deeds, speak great words and suffer noble sorrows.

Charles Reade (1814 - 1884)

Source: The Cloister and the Hearth, ch. 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Reed on day, deed, earth, men, men and women, nobility, suffering, women, and words

Not a day passes over this earth, but men and women of no note do great deeds, speak great words and suffer noble sorrows.

Charles Reed

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Caleb Colton on deed, earth, humanity, and inventions

No one knows where he who invented the plow was born, nor where he died; yet he has done more for humanity than the whole race of heroes who have drenched the earth with blood and whose deeds have been handed down with a precision proportionate only to the mischief they wrought.

Charles Colton (c.1780 - 1832)

Source: wrote Lacon,,2 volumes of aphorisms

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Caedmon on angels, deed, devil, heaven, and hell

The fiend with all his comrades Fell then from heaven above, Through as long as three nights and days, The angels form heaven into hell; And them all the Lord transformed to devils, Because they his deed and word Would not revere.

Caedmon

Source: Creation. The Fall of the Rebel Angels

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Siddhartha Gautama Buddha on deed, evil, thought, word, brahmin, and Holy Man

By whomsoever no evil is done in deed, or word, or thought, him I call a Brahmin (holy man) who is guarded in these three.

Buddha (563 - 483 BC)

Source: The Buddha's "Way of Virtue": A Translation of the Dhammapada from the Pali Text‎ - Page 80

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Siddhartha Gautama Buddha on deed, evil, life, love, avoid, teaching, and poison

Let a man avoid evil deeds as a man who loves life avoids poison.

Buddha (563 - 483 BC)

Source: Dhammapada IX, 123

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Augustin-Louis Cauchy on deed, men, and words

Men pass away, but their deeds abide. [His last words.]

Augustin-Louis Cauchy (1789 - 1857)

Source: H. Eves Mathematical Circles Revisted, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1971.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur H. Compton on courage, deed, discipline, faith, good, hope, lies, life, meaning, nature, needs, religion, science, scientists, thinking, vision, and world

Faith gives the courage to live and do. Scientists, with their disciplined thinking, like others, need a basis for the good life, for aspiration, for courage to do great deeds. They need a faith to live by. The hope of the world lies in those who have such faith and who use the methods of science to make their visions become real. Visions and hope and faith are not part of science. They are beyond the nature that science knows. Of such is the religion that gives meaning to life.

Arthur H. Compton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Guiterman on clarity, deed, heart, husbands, love, passion, strength, thought, tranquility, wives, and words

Husband and Wife Whatever I said and whatever you said, I love you. The word and the moment forever have fled; I love you. The breezes may ruffle the stream in its flow, But tranquil and clear are the waters below; And under all tumult you feel and you know I love you. Whatever you did and whatever I did, I love you. Whatever is open, whatever is hid, I love you. The strength of the oak makes the tempest a mock, The anchor holds firm in the hurricane's shock; Our love is the anchor, the oak and the rock. I love you. Whatever I thought and whatever you thought, I love you. The mood and the passion that made it are naught; I love you. For words, thoughts and deeds, though they rankle and smart, May never delude us or hold us apart Who treasure this talisman deep in the heart "I love you."

Arthur Guiterman (1871 - 1943)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ann Radcliffe on darkness, deed, and fate

Fate sits on these dark battlements and frowns, And as the portal opens to receive me, A voice in hollow murmurs through the courts Tells of a nameless deed.

Ann Radcliffe (1764 - 1823)

Source: "The Mysteries of Udolpho"

Contributed by: Zaady

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