deed

A Quote by George Matthew Adams on character, deed, encouragement, kindness, and success

Everyone who has ever done a kind deed for us, or spoken a word of encouragement to us, has entered into the make-up of our character and our thoughts, as well as our success.

George Matthew Adams

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A Quote by George Herbert on deed and honor

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An ill deed cannot bring honor.

George Herbert (1593 - 1633)

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A Quote by George Eliot on deed, determination, good, men, and world

In the multitude of middle-aged men who go about their vocations in a daily course determined for them much in the same way as the tie of their cravats, there is always a good number who once meant to shape their own deeds and alter the world a little.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 2, ch. 15 (1871–72).

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A Quote by George Eliot on certainty and deed

No great deed is done by falterers who ask for certainty.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

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A Quote by George Eliot on deed and travel

Our deeds still travel with us from afar, And what we have been makes us what we are.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch

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A Quote by George Eliot on deed

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Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Adam Bede

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A Quote by George Chapman on deed, good, life, names, and virtue

So our lives In acts exemplary, not only win Ourselves good names, but doth to others give Matter for virtuous deeds, by which we live.

George Chapman (1560 - 1634)

Source: Bussy de’Ambois, 1607

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A Quote by Geoffrey Chaucer on deed

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She wolde wepe, if that she sawe a mous Caught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde. Of smale houndes had she, that she fedde With rosted flesh, or milk and waster-breed. But sore weep she if oon of hem were deed.

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340 - 1400)

Source: The Canterbury Tales, Prologue

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A Quote by Geoffrey Chaucer on deed

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And when a beest is deed, he hath no peyne; But man after his deeth moot wepe and pleyne.

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340 - 1400)

Source: The Canterbury Tales, Knights Tale

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on admiration, agreement, army, conscience, contentment, darkness, deed, guilt, infidelity, inspiration, jesus, money, murder, pride, sons, soul, suffering, time, traditions, vices, virtue, weakness, women, and world

Why did not this multitude of ignorant pilgrims resist? Why did these greedy chafferers content themselves with dark scowls and muttered maledictions, while they suffered their oxen and sheep to be chased into the streets and themselves ejected, and their money flung rolling on the floor by one who was then young and unknown, and in the garb of despised Galilee? Why, in the same way we might ask, did Saul suffer Samuel to beard him in the very presence of his army? Why did David abjectly obey the orders of Joab? Why did Ahab not dare to arrest Elijah at the door of Naboth's vineyard? Because sin is weakness; because there is in the world nothing so abject as a guilty conscience, nothing so invincible as the sweeping tide of a Godlike indignation against all that is base and wrong. How could these paltry sacrilegious buyers and sellers, conscious of wrongdoing, oppose that scathing rebuke, or face the lightnings of those eyes that were enkindled by an outraged holiness? When Phinehas the priest was zealous for the Lord of Hosts, and drove through the bodies of the prince of Simeon and the Midianitish woman with one glorious thrust of his indignant spear, why did not guilty Israel avenge that splendid murder? Why did not every man of the tribe of Simeon become a Goel to the dauntless assassin? Because Vice cannot stand for one moment before Virtue's uplifted arm. Base and grovelling as they were, these money-mongering Jews felt, in all that remnant of their souls which was not yet eaten away by infidelity and avarice, that the Son of Man was right. Nay, even the Priests and Pharisees, and Scribes and Levites, devoured as they were by pride and formalism, could not condemn an act which might have been performed by a Nehemiah or a Judas Maccabaeus, and which agreed with all that was purest and best in their traditions. But when they had heard of this deed, or witnessed it, and had time to recover from the breathless mixture of admiration, disgust, and astonishment which it inspired, they came to Jesus, and though they did not dare to condemn what He had done, yet half indignantly asked Him for some sign that He had a right to act thus.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.151 & 152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.12, p.169

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