debate

A Quote by Rob Brezsny on ideologies, dismissiveness, and debate

Unless we demonstrate that we have some mastery of their ideology, they’ll dismiss us as intellectual pussies.

Rob Brezsny

Source: Pronoia Is the Antidote for Paranoia: How the Whole World Is Conspiring to Shower You with Blessings, Pages: 66

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Colin Powell on leadership, leader, simplify, simple, debate, and solution

Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers, who can cut through argument, debate, and doubt to offer a solution...

Colin Powell (1937 -)

Contributed by: Mary_C

A Quote by Sherman Alexie on stories, politics, debate, and diversity

Listen to the stories.  You want to help the world?  Read the poetry of the people we're bombing.  Write poetry for them.  Sing songs for them, and for us.  And listen to everybody.

You cannot control how diverse any room is, or any institution, or any policy.  But you can control how diverse you are, and who you love and who you listen to.

So tonight, don't go hang out with your mirrors (whether that's physical or ideological).  Go find somebody you disagree with, and go hang out.

In a perfect world, Barney Frank and Jesse Helms are best friends.

Sherman Alexie

Source: speech, Rutgers University, October 10, 2001; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WUA8vL1L5Q&feature=related

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Gerard Vanderhaar on respect, dialog, truth, arguing, and debate

Respectful dialog, in the interest of searching for more complete truth, is considerably more productive than arguing for the purity of position.

Gerard Vanderhaar

Contributed by: Mary_C

A Quote by Arthur Schopenhauer on argument, deluding, ad auditores, and debate

This is chiefly practicable in a dispute between scholars in the presence of the unlearned. If you have no argument ad rem, and none either ad hominem, you can make one ad auditores; that is to say, you can start some invalid objection, which, however, only an expert sees to be invalid. Now your opponent is an expert, but those who form your audience are not, and accordingly in their eyes he is defeated; particularly if the objection which you make places him in any ridiculous light. People are ready to laugh, and you have the laughers on your side. To show that your objection is an idle one, would require a long explanation on the part of your opponent, and a reference to the principles of the branch of knowledge in question, or to the elements of the matter which you are discussing; and people are not disposed to listen to it. For example, your opponent states that in the original formation of a mountain-range the granite and other elements in its composition were, by reason of their high temperature, in a fluid or molten state; that the temperature must have amounted to some 480 degrees Fahrenheit; and that when the mass took shape it was covered by the sea. You reply, by an argument ad auditores, that at that temperature - nay, indeed, long before it had been reached, namely, at 212 degrees Fahrenheit - the sea would have been boiled away, and spread through the air in the form of steam. At this the audience laughs. To refute the objection, your opponent would have to show that the boiling-point depends not only on the degree of warmth, but also on the atmospheric pressure; and that as soon as about half the sea-water had gone off in the shape of steam, this pressure would be so greatly increased that the rest of it would fail to boil even at a temperature of 480 degrees. He is debarred from giving this explanation, as it would require a treatise to demonstrate the matter to those who had no acquaintance with physics.

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

Source: http://coolhaus.de/art-of-controversy/erist28.htm

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Avram Noam Chomsky on debate, inquiry, doctrine, crimes, critics, and respectability

"To achieve respectability, to be admitted to the debate, they must accept without question or inquiry the fundamental doctrine that the state is benevolent, governed by the loftiest intentions, adopting a defensive stance, not an actor in world affairs but only reacting to the crimes of others...If even the harshest of critics tacitly adopt these premises, then the ordinary person may ask, who am I to disagree?"

Noam Chomsky (1928 -)

Contributed by: Demian

A Quote by William Bateson on argument, authority, commitment, courage, debate, encouragement, evolution, facts, failure, faith, familiarity, imagination, irony, popularity, power, research, simplicity, theory, and value

Empirical confirmation of Darwin's theory did not prove forthcoming in the first few decades following its publication. Indeed, by the early twentieth century, many noted naturalists had come to regard Darwin's account of evolution by natural selection as a theoretical failure. Some even described their continuing commitment to evolution as a matter of faith, rather an ironic justification in light of the impending Scopes trial of 1925. "I suppose that everyone is familiar in outline with the theory of the origin of species which Darwin promulgated. Through the last fifty years this theme of the natural selection of favored races has been developed and expounded in writings innumerable. Favored races certainly can replace others. The argument is sound, but we are doubtful of its value. For us that debate stands adjourned. We go to Darwin for his incomparable collection of facts. We would fain emulate his scholarship, his width and his power of exposition, but to us he speaks no more with philosophical authority. We read his scheme of evolution as we would those of Leucretius or of Lamarck, delighting in their simplicity and courage." "Modern research lends not the smallest encouragement or sanction to the view that gradual evolution occurs by the transformation of masses of individuals, though that fancy has fixed itself on popular imagination."

William Bateson (1861 - 1926)

Source: Address of the President of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, August 14, 1914

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Lippmann on ability, age, belief, children, debate, intelligence, judgment, and research

In the course of a debate with Lewis Terman: Without offering any data on all that occurs between conception and the age of kindergarten, they announce on the basis of what they have got out of a few thousand questionnaires that they are measuring the hereditary mental endowment of human beings. Obviously, this is not a conclusion obtained by research. It is a conclusion planted by the will to believe. It is, I think, for the most part unconsciously planted. . . . If the impression takes root that these tests really measure intelligence, that they constitute a sort of last judgment on the child's capacity, that they reveal "scientifically" his predestined ability, then it would be a thousand times better if all the intelligence testers and all their questionnaires were sunk in the Sargasso Sea.

Walter Lippmann (1889 - 1974)

Source: quoted: Stephen Jay Gould, The Mismeasure of Man, W.W.Norton & Co., Ltd, NY, 1996

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on action, belief, debate, decisions, goals, government, heart, idealism, ideas, information, laws, lies, life, persuasion, politics, principles, rest, risk, and speech

At the heart of the First Amendment lies the principle that each person should decide for him or herself the ideas and beliefs deserving of expression, consideration, and adherence. Our political system and cultural life rest upon this ideal. Government action that stifles speech on account of its message, or that requires the utterance of a particular message favored by the Government, contravenes this essential right. Laws of this sort pose the inherent risk that the Government seeks not to advance a legitimate regulatory goal, but to suppress unpopular ideas or information or manipulate the public debate through coercion rather than persuasion.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1994, Turner Broadcasting System v. FCC, 114 S. Ct. 2445, 2458

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on acting, approval, debate, defense, expectation, history, kindness, men, military, service, and time

The signification attributed to the term Militia appears from the debates in the [Constitutional] Convention, the history and legislation of Colonies and States, and the writings of approved commentators. These show plainly enough that the Militia comprised all males physically capable of acting in concert for the common defense. . . . And further, that ordinarily when called for service these men were expected to appear bearing arms supplied by themselves and of the kind in common use at the time.

unknown

Source: United States Supreme Court, 1939 U.S. v. Miller

Contributed by: Zaady

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