death

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on death and glory

The lads that will die in their glory and never be old.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 23, st. 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on beginning, day, death, earth, and heaven

These, in the day when heaven was falling, The hour when earth's foundations fled, Followed their mercenary calling And took their wages and are dead. The British regulars who made the retreat from Mons, beginning August 24, 1914.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: Last Poems, 1922, 37 (Epitaph on an Army of Mercenaries), st. I

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adelaide Crapsey on dawn, death, justice, and silence

These beThree silent things: The Falling snow. . . the hour Before the dawn. . . the mouth of one Just dead. 

Adelaide Crapsey (1878 - 1914)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adelaide Love on death and journeys

If you should go before me, dear, walk slowly Down the ways of death, well worn and wide, For I would want to overtake you quickly And seek the journey's ending by your side. I would be so forlorn not to descry you Down some shining high road when I came; Walk slowly, dear, and often look behind you, And pause to hear if someone calls your name.

Adelaide Love

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on death and popularity

Has it [popular sovereignty] not got down as thin as the homeopathic soup that was made by boiling the shadow of a pigeon that had starved to death?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: response in the sixth debate with Senator Stephen A. Douglas, October 13, 1858.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on day, death, and laughter

With the fearful strain that is on me night and day, if I did not laugh I should die.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on birth, bravery, death, dedication, earth, fatherhood, fighting, freedom, god, government, liberty, life, men, nations, people, power, struggle, testing, war, work, and world

Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or to detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far nobly so advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Address at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on army, authors, danger, death, destruction, earth, expectation, force, military, nations, suicide, and time

At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide. At what point shall we expect the approach of danger? By what means shall we fortify against it? hall we expect some transatlantic military giant, to step the Ocean, and crush us at a blow? Never! All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined, with all the treasure of the earth (our own excepted) in their military chest; with a Buonaparte for a commander, could not by force, take a drink from the Ohio, or make a track on the Blue Ridge, in a trial of a thousand years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, January 27, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on achievement, certainty, change, death, diversity, existence, god, grace, life, peace, prophets, reality, reason, traditions, unity, and words

There are two kinds of death, the death which is inevitable and common to all beings, and the death which is voluntary and particular to certain ones of them only. It is the second death which is prescribed for us in the words of the Messenger of Allah: "Die before you die." The resurrection is accomplished for him who dies this voluntary death. His affairs return to God and they are but one. He has returned to God and he sees Him through Him. As the Prophet said - on him be Grace and Peace! - according to a tradition reported by Tabarani, "You will not see your Lord before being dead" and that is because, in the contemplation of this dead-resurrected one, all creatures are annihilated, and for him only one thing exists, one Reality only. Whatever will be the lot of the believers in their posthumous states is prefigured in one degree or another in this life for the initiates. The "return" of things - considered in relation to [the diversity of] their forms - to Allah and the end of their becoming, expresses only a change of cognitive status and not at all a modification of the reality. For him who dies and achieves the resurrection, the multiple is one, by reason of its essential unity; and the One is multiple, by reason of the multiplicity in Him of relations and aspects.

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 221, pp. 51-52

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by A. Whitney Brown on death and time

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Enjoy every minute. There's plenty of time to be dead.

A. Whitney Brown

Contributed by: Zaady

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