death

A Quote by Alma P. Burton on action, blessings, body, change, death, existence, god, immortality, learning, life, men, mortality, progress, spirit, time, and tragedy

It is in the plan that man should die. The rich, the poor; the bond, the free; the great, the lowly-all must die. Death comes to everyone. Death * a necessary step to our eterrzal progression. But death is not the end, it is only a transitional state whereby we move from one stage of action to another. The spirit continues to live, move, think, learn, and to engage in all those activities associated with existence in our next estate. The physical body is placed in the grave, there to remain until the time of our resurrection. The change called death is ordained of God awl is a blessing to man. It would be tragic if men could never be released from mortality that they might put on immortality. Death releases man from his mortal existence and makes possible his onward progress toward eterrzal life and exaltation.

Alma P. Burton (1913 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Allison Borowick on death and loneliness

A lonely tulip Dying on the dirt filled road Never waking up

Allison Borowick

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alma P. Burton on christ, death, earth, eternity, god, grace, life, mortality, progress, salvation, sons, and work

John declared that "Christ received not of the fulness at the first," but that he "continued from grace to grace until he received a fulnesss and thus he was called the Son of God, because he received not of the fulness at the first." Thus is it with us all. We must work out our salvation and exaltation by coming to this earth. Man must be born into mortality and live and die that he may continue in his progress toward eternal life and exaltation.

Alma P. Burton (1913 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Allen E. Claxton, DD on community, crime, death, laziness, nations, and psychology

As individuals find crime to be a dead-end street, so communities and nations are subject to the same psychology. The moral side of public opinion is traditionally lazy, but there is an indefinable point at which it can be and is aroused.

Allen E. Claxton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alix Pasterick on death and life

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To live is not to die, to die is to not have lived.

Alix Pasterick

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Algernon Charles Swinburne on brevity, death, fear, hope, life, love, and men

From too much love of living, From hope and fear set free, We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods may be That no man lives forever, That dead men rise up never; That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea.

Algernon Swinburne (1837 - 1909)

Source: The Garden of Proserpine.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Algernon Charles Swinburne on beginning, death, endurance, gifts, grief, heaven, hell, life, love, madness, pain, pleasure, strength, tears, and time

Before the beginning of years There came to the making of man Time with a gift of tears, Grief with a glass that ran, Pleasure with pain for leaven, Summer with flowers that fell, Remembrance fallen from heaven, And Madness risen from hell, Strength without hands to smite, Love that endures for a breath; Night, the shadow of light, And Life, the shadow of death.

Algernon Swinburne (1837 - 1909)

Source: Atalanta in Calydon. Chorus.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Algernon Charles Swinburne on death, life, and men

At the door of life by the gate of breath, There are worse things waiting for men than death.

Algernon Swinburne (1837 - 1909)

Source: The Triumph of Time.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on death

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No Roman ever died in contemplation over a geometrical diagram. A reference to the death of Archimedes.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: H. Eves Mathematical Circles Squared, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1972.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Noyes on christmas, day, death, dreams, glory, gold, home, mountains, and songs

The Three Ships As I went up the mountain-side The sea below me glitter'd wide, And, Eastward, far away, I spied On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, The three great ships that take the tide On Christmas Day in the morning. Ye have heard the song, how these must ply From the harbours of home to the ports o' the skyl Do ye dream none knoweth the whither and why On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day The three great ships go sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning? Yet, as I live, I never knew That ever a song could ring so true, Till I saw them break thro' a haze of blue On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the marvellous ancient flags they flew On Christmas Day in the morning! From the heights above the belfried town I saw that the sails were patched and brown, But the 9ags were a-fiame with a great renown On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, And on every mast was a golden crown On Christmas Day in the morning. Most marvellous ancient ships were these! Were their prows a-plunge to the Chersonese, For the pomp of Rome, or the glory of Greece, On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Were they out on a quest for the Golden Fleece On Christmas Day in the morning? The sun and the wind they told me there How goodly a load the three ships bear, For the first is gold and the second is myrrh On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the third is frankincense most rare, On Christmas Day in the morning. They have mixed their shrouds with the golden sky, They have faded away where the last dreams die . . . Ah yet, will ye watch, when the mist lifts high On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Will ye see three ships come sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning?

Alfred Noyes (1880 - 1958)

Contributed by: Zaady

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