day

A Quote by William Shakespeare on brevity, day, death, life, and time

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day To the last syllable of recorded time, And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage And then is heard no more: it is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, spoken by Macbeth, Act V, scene v.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day and death

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The worst is death, and death will have his day.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day and worth

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Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: The Merchant of Venice, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on cats, day, and dogs

The cat will mew, and dog will have his day.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, 1602

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day and time

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Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 1, scene 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day

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This above all: to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library), Pages: Act I Scene iii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day and world

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O, how full of briers is this working-day world!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, act 1, scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, innocence, life, nature, and sleep

. . . the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleeve of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great Nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast,--

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on business and day

O! that a man might know The end of this day's business, ere it come; But it sufficeth that the day will end, And then the end is known.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, god, happiness, life, and mortality

O God! methinks it were a happy life, To be no better than a homely swain; To sit upon a hill, as I do now, To carve out dials, quaintly, point by point, Thereby to see the minutes how they run, How many make the hour full complete; How many hours bring about the day; How many days will finish up the year; How many years a mortal man may live.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI

Contributed by: Zaady

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