day

A Quote by William Wordsworth on day, death, and perception

At length the man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on beginning, birth, children, day, death, dreams, earth, fatherhood, glory, god, heart, heaven, home, joy, lies, life, nature, past, perception, sleep, soul, time, travel, vision, wishes, and youth

"My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So it was when my life began; So it is now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The Child is Father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety." There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream, It is not now as it hath been of yore ;- Turn whereso'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more. . . . . But yet I know, where'er I go, That there hath past away a glory from the earth. . . . . Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting; The Soul that rises with us, our life's Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar: Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory do we come From God, who is our home: Heaven lies about us in our infancy! Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing Boy, But He beholds the light, and whence it flows, And sees it in his joy; The Youth, who daily farther from the east Must travel, still is Nature's Priest, And by the vision splendid Is on his way attended; At length the Man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood”

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on day and dreams

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Hunt half a day for a forgotten dream.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Hart-leap Well. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on day, dreams, earth, glory, and time

There was a time when meadow, grove and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream. It is not now as it hath been of yore: - Turn wheresoe'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ode, Intimations of Immortality

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Symonds on admiration, cleverness, company, day, diversity, fatherhood, god, history, liberty, life, people, and world

William Symonds, in his 1612 history of the Virginia colonies, also omits the Pocahontas episode, relating instead that Smith secured his release through his own clever connivance: "A month those Barbarians kept him prisoner, many strange triumphes and conjurations they made of him, yet hee so demeaned himselfe amongst them, as he not only diverted them from surprising the Fort, but procured his owne liberty, and got himselfe and his company such estimation amongst them, that those Salvages admired him as a demi-God. ...So he had inchanted those poor soules (being their prisoner) in demonstrating unto them the roundnesse of the world, the course of the moone and starres, the cause of the day and night the largenes of the seas the quallities of our ships, shot and powder, The devision of the world, with the diversity of people, their complexions, customs and conditions. All which he fained to be under the command of Captaine Newport, whom he tearmed to them his father; of whose arrival, it chanced he so directly prophesied, as they esteemed him an oracle; by these fictions he not only saved his owne life, and obtained his liberty, but had them at that command, he might command what he listed."

William Symonds

Source: The Proceedings of the English Colonies in Virginia..., 1612

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on day, pity, and thought

It was such a lovely day I thought it a pity to get up.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on day, good, men, and soul

I forget who it was that recommended men for their soul's good to do each day two things they disliked. . . . It is a precept I have followed scrupulously: for every day I have got up and I have gone to bed.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Source: The Moon and Sixpence, 1919, ch. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment, day, and endings

All is well ended if this suit be won. That you express content; which we will pay, With strife to please you, day exceeding day.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: All’s Well That Ends Well, Act 5, scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, judgment, and men

Men judge by the complexion of the sky The state and inclination of the day:

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day

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It is the bright day that brings forth the adder; And that craves wary walking.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 2, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

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