dawn

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on birth, bitterness, cities, darkness, dawn, death, doubt, emptiness, horses, information, journeys, justice, lies, men, people, regret, sleep, thought, time, travel, water, weather, wine, and women

Journey of the Magi "A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For a journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter." And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation, With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, And three trees on the low sky. And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins. But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thornton Niven Wilder on dawn

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For what human ill does dawn not seem to be an alternative?

Thornton Wilder (1897 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hood on dawn, day, and time

No sun, no moon, no morn, no noon, No dawn, no dusk, no proper time of day, . . . . . . No road, no street, no t' other side the way, . . . . . . No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees, No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no buds.

Thomas Hood (1798 - 1845)

Source: November.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on dawn and love

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When love could teach a monarch to be wise, And gospel-light first dawn'd from Bullen's eyes.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sylvia Townsend Warner on accuracy, books, dawn, joy, justice, kindness, libraries, mathematics, mind, novelty, and passion

For twenty pages perhaps, he read slowly, carefully, dutifully, with pauses for self-examination and working out examples. Then, just as it was working up and the pauses should have been more scrupulous than ever, a kind of swoon and ecstasy would fall on him, and he read ravening on, sitting up till dawn to finish the book, as though it were a novel. After that his passion was stayed; the book went back to the Library and he was done with mathematics till the next bout. Not much remained with him after these orgies, but something remained: a sensation in the mind, a worshiping acknowledgment of something isolated and unassailable, or a remembered mental joy at the rightness of thoughts coming together to a conclusion, accurate thoughts, thoughts in just intonation, coming together like unaccompanied voices coming to a close.

Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893 - 1978)

Source: Mr. Fortune's Maggot.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir William Davenant on beauty, dawn, day, and seasons

Aubade THE lark now leaves his wat'ry nest, And climbing shakes his dewy wings. He takes this window for the East, And to implore your light he sings- Awake, awake! the morn will never rise Till she can dress her beauty at your eyes. The merchant bows unto the seaman's star, The ploughman from the sun his season takes, But still the lover wonders what they are Who look for day before his mistress wakes. Awake, awake! break thro' your veils of lawn! Then draw your curtains, and begin the dawn!

Sir William Davenant (1606 - 1668)

Source: Aubade

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Scandinavian Proverb on birds, darkness, dawn, and faith

Faith is like a bird that feels dawn breaking and sings while it is still dark.

Scandinavian Proverb

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sarah Knowles Bolton on bravery, dawn, and tears

Be glad today. Tomorrow may bring tears. Be brave today. The darkest night will pass. And golden rays will usher in the dawn.

Sarah Knowles Bolton (1841 - 1916)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Lee Frost on dawn, day, and gold

So dawn goes down to day Nothing gold can stay.

Robert Frost

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ray Stannard Baker on ability, acceptance, beginning, blindness, body, confidence, dawn, destiny, disease, doctors, effort, failure, fear, kindness, mind, nature, reason, rest, reward, security, struggle, suffering, time, tranquility, and yiel

Suddenly it came to me, as a kind of new light, that I would no longer resist and struggle; I would accept the unavoidable. If it was in the nature of my disease, what else that was wise could I do? At first the torment, ravaging unrestrained, seemed even worse than before. It consumed me utterly. But I had a glimmering sense that I was at least playing a voluntary part in my own destiny; that, somehow, I was substituting reason for blind, involuntary, fear-driven resistance. This effort I continued through the greater part of one terrible night, failing often, unable to yield completely, driven by red-hot scourges into the old resistances. At dawn, in spite of the best medication the doctors knew, I was exhausted, but I began to feel that I was on the way toward what might be, for me, a new method. This I practiced faithfully and with increasing confidence for some time. I no longer resisted the inevitable! I am not sure that there was a great decrease in the actual physical suffering; I do know that the period of the paroxysm was reduced, since resistance seemed merely to prolong it. But the great reward was in the mind: in my own ability to command myself in the face of such a catastrophe; to preserve my equanimity; to rest securely upon reason when panic might so easily overwhelm me. I had moments in the midst of such paroxysms during the earlier nights when I was so secure in mind, so tranquil, that I felt it did not much matter what happened to my body. Nothing could touch me.

Ray Stannard Baker (1870 - 1946)

Source: Under My Elm by David Grayson

Contributed by: Zaady

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