daughters

A Quote by Charles Lamb on darkness, daughters, and farewells

Farewell, farewell to thee, Araby's daughter! Thus warbled a Peri beneath the dark sea.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: The Fire-Worshippers.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dance on daughters, day, dreams, heart, love, and youth

By the margin of fair Zurich's waters Dwelt a youth, whose fond heart, night and day, For the fairest of fair Zurich's daughters In a dream of love melted away.

Charles Dance (1794 - 1863)

Source: Fair Zurich's Waters.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bruce Barton on daughters, enthusiasm, gifts, and sons

If you can give your son or daughter only one gift, let it be Enthusiasm.

Bruce Barton (1886 - 1967)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on daughters and wives

An undutiful daughter will prove an unmanageable wife.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on admiration, daughters, and ignorance

Admiration is the daughter of ignorance.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on daughters, fear, hope, ignorance, nature, and religion

RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on affection, charity, daughters, delusion, enthusiasm, faith, family, fatherhood, hope, self-denial, and sons

DELUSION, n. The father of a most respectable family, comprising Enthusiasm, Affection, Self-denial, Faith, Hope, Charity and many other goodly sons and daughters.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Einstein on daughters, education, independence, order, sons, students, suffering, and teachers

To a student: Dear Miss - I have read about sixteen pages of your manuscript . . . I suffered exactly the same treatment at the hands of my teachers who disliked me for my independence and passed over me when they wanted assistants. . . . Keep your manuscript for your sons and daughters, in order that they may derive consolation from it and not give a damn for what their teachers tell them or think of them. . . . There is too much education altogether.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: Albert Einstein, The World as I See It, The Wisdom Library, New York, 1949

Contributed by: Zaady

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