darkness

A Quote by William Wordsworth on beginning, darkness, good, meaning, prayer, and words

"What is good for a bootless bene?" With these dark words begins my tale; And their meaning is, Whence can comfort spring When prayer is of no avail?

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Force of Prayer.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on brevity, choice, confusion, darkness, death, dreams, earth, friendship, heaven, history, love, power, sympathy, and war

Ay me! for aught that I could ever read, Could ever hear by tale or history, The course of true love never did run smooth. But, either it was different in blood,- Or else it stood upon the choice of friends,- Or, if there were a sympathy in choice, War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it, Making it momentany as a sound, Swift as a shadow, short as any dream; Brief as the lightning in the collied night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth, And ere a man hath power to say 'Behold!' The jaws of darkness do devour it up: So quick bright things come to confusion.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act I, scene i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on consequences, darkness, devil, and honesty

What! can the devil speak true? And oftentimes, to win us to our harm, The instruments of darkness tell us truths; Win us with honest trifles, to betray 's In deepest consequence.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 1, scene 3,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on darkness, devil, and modesty

Fie, thou dishonest Satan! I call thee by the most modest terms; for I am one of those gentle ones that will use the devil himself with courtesy: sayest thou that house is dark?

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Twelfth Night, Act 4, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on darkness, music, spirit, and trust

The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night And his affections dark as Erebus: Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: The Merchant of Venice, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on change, darkness, music, nature, spirit, time, and trust

But music for the time doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night And his affections dark as Erebus: Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merchant of Venice, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on darkness, love, madness, punishment, and reason

ROSALIND But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak? ORLANDO Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much. ROSALIND Love is merely a madness, and, I tell you, deserves as well a dark house and a whip as madmen do: and the reason why they are not so punished and cured is, that the lunacy is so ordinary that the whippers are in love too.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: AS YOU LIKE IT, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on birth, blindness, charm, darkness, dogs, good, hell, judaism, sleep, and trouble

First Witch Round about the cauldron go; In the poison'd entrails throw. Toad, that under cold stone Days and nights has thirty-one Swelter'd venom sleeping got, Boil thou first i' the charmed pot. ALL Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. Second Witch Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog, Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg and owlet's wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. ALL Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bubble. Third Witch Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf, Witches' mummy, maw and gulf Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark, Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark, Liver of blaspheming Jew, Gall of goat, and slips of yew Silver'd in the moon's eclipse, Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips, Finger of birth-strangled babe Ditch-deliver'd by a drab, Make the gruel thick and slab: Add thereto a tiger's chaudron, For the ingredients of our cauldron. ALL Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bubble. Second Witch Cool it with a baboon's blood, Then the charm is firm and good.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 4, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on darkness

The prince of darkness is a gentleman.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Lear, Act III, scene iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on darkness and day

The bright day is done, And we are for the dark.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Antony and Cleopatra, Act 5, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

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