dance

A Quote by Robert Southey on dance and water

Delaying and straying and playing and spraying, Advancing and prancing and glancing and dancing, Recoiling, turmoiling and toiling and boiling, And gleaming and streaming and steaming and beaming, And rushing and flushing and brushing and gushing, And flapping and rapping and clapping and slapping, And curling and whirling and purling and twirling, And thumping and plumping and bumping and jumping, And dashing and flashing and splashing and clashing; And so never ending, but always descending, Sounds and motions forever and ever are blending, All at once and all o'er, with a mighty uproar, And this way the water comes down at Lodore.

Robert Southey (1774 - 1843)

Source: William G. Hoffman’s The Speaker’s Notebook

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on adversity, beginning, bitterness, charity, christmas, church, clarity, dance, darkness, day, fatherhood, garden, good, home, justice, kindness, life, motherhood, nature, pain, sons, soul, and understanding

Christmas at Sea The sheets were frozen hard, and they cut the naked hand; The decks were like a slide, where a seaman scarce could stand, The wind was a nor'-wester, blowing squally off the sea; And the cliffs and spouting breakers were the only thing a-lee. They heard the surf a-roaring before the break of day; But 'twas only with the peep of light we saw how ill we lay. We tumbled every hand on deck instanter, with a shout, And we gave her the maintops'l, and stood by to go about. All day we tack'd and tack'd between the South Head and the North; All day we haul'd the frozen sheets, and got no further forth; All day as cold as charity, in bitter pain and dread, For very life and nature we tack'd from head to head. We gave the South a wider berth, for there the tide-race roar'd; But every tack we made we brought the North Head close aboard; So's we saw the cliffs and houses, and the breakers running high, And the coastguard in his garden, with his glass against his eye. The frost was on the village roofs as white as ocean foam; The good red fires were burning bright in every 'longshore home; , The windows sparkled clear, and the chimneys volley'd out; And I vow we sniff'd the victuals as the vessel went about. The bells upon the church were rung with a right jovial cheer For it's just that I should tell you how (of all days in the year) This day of our adversity was blessed Christmas morn, And the house above the coastguard's was the house where I was born. O well I saw the pleasant room, the pleasant faces there, My mother's silver spectacles, my father's silver hair; And well I saw the firelight, like a flight of homely elves Go dancing round the china-plates that stand upon the shelves! And well I knew the talk they had, the talk that was of me, Of the shadow on the household and the son that went to sea; And O the wicked fool I seem'd, in every kind of way, To be here and hauling frozen ropes on blessed Christmas Day. They lit the high sea-light, and the dark began to fall. "All hands to loose topgallant sails." I heard the captain call. "By the Lord, she'll never stand it," our first mate Jackson cried. . . . "It's the one way or the other, Mr. Jackson," he replied. She stagger'd to her bearings, but the sails were new and good, And the ship smelt up to windward just as though she understood. As the winter's day was ending, in the entry of the night, We clear'd the weary headland, and pass'd below the light. And they heaved a mighty breath, every soul on board but me, As they saw her nose again pointing handsome out to sea; But all that I could think of, in the darkness and the cold, Was just that I was leaving home and my folks were growing old.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Browning on dance, poets, and women

Round and round, like a dance of snow In a dazzling drift, as its guardians, go Floating the women faded for ages, Sculptured in stone on the poet's pages.

Robert Browning (1812 - 1889)

Source: Women and Roses.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Alton Harris on dance and execution

You can be a king or a street sweeper, but everyone dances with the Grim Reaper. Executed in California's gas chamber.

Robert Alton Harris

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on children, dance, darkness, divinity, ideas, music, nature, order, poets, privacy, privilege, and women

THE POET A moody child and wildly wise Pursued the game with joyful eyes, Which chose, like meteors, their way, And rived the dark with private ray: They overleapt the horizon's edge, Searched with Apollo's privilege; Through man, and woman, and sea, and star, Saw the dance of nature forward far; Through worlds, and races, and terms, and times, Saw musical order, and pairing rhymes. Olympian bards who sung Divine ideas below, Which always find us young, And always keep us so.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: “The Poet,” from Essays: Second Series

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on dance, heart, identity, insults, joy, kindness, nature, and speech

An eye can threaten like a loaded and levelled gun, or it can insult like hissing or kicking; or, in its altered mood, by beams of kindness, it can make the heart dance for joy. . . . One of the most wonderful things in nature is a glance of the eye; it transcends speech; it is the bodily symbol of identity.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rabindranath Tagore on dance, life, and time

Let your life lightly dance on the edges of Time like dew on the tip of a leaf.

Rabindranath Tagore (1861 - 1941)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Oliver Wendell Holmes on dance

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Ay, tear her tattered ensign down! Long has it waved on high, And many an eye has danced to see That banner in the sky. Beneath it rung the battle shout, And burst the cannon's roar- The meteor of the ocean air Shall sweep the clouds no more.

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

Source: Old Ironsides.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ogden Nash on dance and truth

There is something about a martini, Ere the dining and dancing begin, And to tell you the truth, It is not the vermouth- I think that perhaps it's the gin.

Ogden Nash (1902 - 1971)

Source: The Primrose Path. 1935, A Drink with Something in It

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Muhammad Ali on dance and losing

The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses - behind the lines, in the gym and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights.

Muhammad Ali (1942 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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