customers

A Quote by Steve Case on vision, customers, people, and computers

I think one of the things that was useful to me was not really college, but just reading books and studying how major consumer innovations took place. If you look back at the history of the telephone a century earlier, it took decades before it was common. Initially people said, "Why would I ever need a phone? If I want to talk to somebody I'll just go next door and talk to them." You couldn't imagine that people would have phones. So eventually, after many years, maybe there was a phone in the bar in town. If you had to make a call to somebody, you'd go to that one phone and enter a party line, a shared line, and so forth. Eventually, it got to the point where people did say, "You know, you do need a phone in your home!" By the time I was growing up everybody had a phone in their home. Today they have multiple phones in their homes and cell phones and computer access with instant messaging.

Steve Case

Source: Academy of Achievement: Steve Case Interview: http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/cas1int-1

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jeff Immelt on customers

You can't delegate growth or customer satisfaction. I'm spending four or five days a month with customers. Twice every month, I do town-hall meetings with several hundred customers to share ideas on GE's direction and listen to their thoughts on what we can do better. And we're doing what I call dreaming sessions with key customer groups, trying to think about where our business and their business will be in 5 or 10 years. I'm probably spending 30% of the time on people, teaching and coaching. I'm using 10% of my time on governance, working with the board, meeting with investors. The rest would be time spent on the plumbing of the company, working on operating reviews and strategy sessions.

Jeff Immelt

Source: The Fast Company Interview: Jeff Immelt: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/96/jeff-immelt.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Caterina on customers, community, and web

We started our company in 2002 when nothing was getting funded anywhere and everyone was still licking their wounds from the big bubble bang. Nobody cared about us except us. We were in Vancouver fer crissakes. But we were able to focus on finding and connecting with the people who mattered most: the customers, the users, the community. You get more done when no one's looking over your shoulder.

Caterina Fake

Source: Caterina.net: It's a bad time to start a company: http://www.caterina.net/archive/000965.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Yvon Chouinard on growth, business, and customers

Growth isn't central at all, because I'm trying to run this company as if it's going to be here a hundred years from now. And if you take where we are today and add 15% growth, like public companies need to have for their stock to stay up in value, I'd be a multi-trillion-dollar company in 40 years. Which is impossible, of course.

So all of these companies that are going for the big growth, if it continues for any length of time, will outlast their resources and outlast their customers and go belly-up. And that's why these huge companies have massive layoffs all the time.

Since I'm trying to run this company like it's going to be around a hundred years from now, we have to limit our growth and keep it to what we call "natural growth." In other words, I don't advertise on billboards in inner cities so that kids buy our black down jackets instead of The North Face's. In fact, we hardly advertise at all.

We grow by letting the customer tell us. So when the customer tells us that they're frustrated, that they just got their catalogue and we're already out of a product they wanted, then it tells me that we're not making enough. We let the customer tell us instead of creating an artificial demand for our products. Any time you're making products that people don't need, you're at the mercy of the economy, you're at the mercy of whatever is going on. So we tried to avoid that situation.

Yvon Chouinard

Source: The TH Interview: Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia (Part One): http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/02/the_th_interview_yvon_chouinard.php

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Ken Hendricks on business, customers, people, entrepreneurship, and leadership

If you were charged with fixing the U.S. auto industry, how would you do it?

The guys who run the auto companies are out of touch with their customers and their employees. They ride to work in their limousines. They go up in their elevators and lock themselves in their offices. They don't walk out into the plants. They wouldn't even drive in the neighborhoods where their employees live. They give themselves big bonuses when the company isn't making any money. I'd make them get involved with the people who are building the cars. They've got to become real people.

Ken Hendricks

Source: Inc: 10 questions for Ken Hendricks: http://www.inc.com/magazine/20061201/entrepreneur-questions.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Jeff Immelt on customers, coaching, leadership, and business

You can't delegate growth or customer satisfaction. I'm spending four or five days a month with customers. Twice every month, I do town-hall meetings with several hundred customers to share ideas on GE's direction and listen to their thoughts on what we can do better. And we're doing what I call dreaming sessions with key customer groups, trying to think about where our business and their business will be in 5 or 10 years. I'm probably spending 30% of the time on people, teaching and coaching. I'm using 10% of my time on governance, working with the board, meeting with investors. The rest would be time spent on the plumbing of the company, working on operating reviews and strategy sessions.

Jeff Immelt

Source: Fast Company Interview: Jeff Immelt: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/96/jeff-immelt.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Stephen Shapiro on branding, brand, customers, and experience

Much literature has been written on branding. 

But what is a brand?  Can you define it in just 6 words?

No, it is not Nike’s “swoop.”  It is not McDonald’s “I’m Lovin’ It” jingle.  It is not Accenture’s Tiger Woods ads.  It is not the design of my website or my “Unconventional Thinking” tag line.

Erik Hansen, Tom Peters’ brand manager (and a good friend of mine), said it quite eloquently.  A brand is… “what your customers say it is.” 

What is great about this definition is that it gives you direct access to changing your brand.  To change your brand you must change your customers’ perceptions and experiences.  No logo or advertising campaign has ever done this.

Stephen Shapiro

Source: Stephen Shapiro Blog: How to Change and Organizations Culture: http://www.steveshapiro.com/2007/10/01/how-to-change-an-organizations-culture/

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Bill George on commitment, success, and customers

The bottom line is it is really important to be involved with your salespeople. CEO Anne Mulcahy has said she will go anywhere anytime to save a Xerox customer. That's the kind of engagement you have to have to be successful.

Bill George

Source: Incentive Interview with Bill George: True Leader: http://www.salesandmarketing.com/msg/content_display/incentive/e3i5f94aaae55a5d3db008e813d8c8c944a

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Shelly Lazarus on customers, marketing, and business

We're living in a world now where consumers are bombarded with thousands of commercial messages - they're everywhere you look. Unless you can cut through that and engage someone, I think you are lost. Consumers are now clearly in control. They control what they hear and see, when, and where. You have to find ways to allow them to actively engage with you, or the money you spend is wasted.

Shelly Lazarus

Source: Interview with Ogilvy and Mather CEO Shelly Lazarus: http://money.cnn.tv/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2007/09/17/100258877/index.htm

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Thomas J. "Tom" Peters on employees, customers, and business

CEO Hal Rosenbluth chronicled the incredible success of his travel-services firm, Rosenbluth Internationl, in...

The Customer Comes Second.

Love that title!

Who comes first? Don't be silly, says King Hal; it's employees. That is -- and this dear Watson, is elementary -- if you genuinely want to put customers first, you must put employees more first.

Tom Peters (1942 -)

Source: The Pursuit of Wow!, Pages: 55

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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