custom

A Quote by Edmund Burke on custom

in

Custom reconciles us to everything.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: On the Sublime and Beautiful. Sect. xviii. vol. i. p. 231.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Diogenes Laertius on cities, custom, and laws

There is a written and an unwritten law. The one by which we regulate our constitutions in our cities is the written law; that which arises from custom is the unwritten law.

Diogenes Laertius

Source: Plato

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Christian Nestell Bovée on custom, freedom, and tyranny

There is no tyrant like custom, and no freedom where its edicts are not resisted.

Christian Bovee (1820 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Carrie Chapman Catt on custom, laws, and popularity

No written law has ever been more binding than unwritten custom supported by popular opinion.

Carrie Chapman Catt (1859 - 1947)

Source: Speech, Why . . . an Amendment, at Senate hearing on woman's suffrage, February 13, 1900

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bernard Mannes Baruch on adoption, america, belief, clothes, custom, maturity, people, and path

America has never forgotten - and will never forget - the nobler things that brought her into being and that light her path - the path that was entered upon only one hundred and fifty years ago. . . . How young she is! It will be centuries before she will adopt that maturity of custom - the clothing of the grave - that some people believe she is already fitted for.

Bernard Baruch (1870 - 1965)

Source: Address on accepting The Churchman Award, New York, May 23, 1944

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on books, conventionality, custom, fashion, hope, and literature

USAGE, n. The First Person of the literary Trinity, the Second and Third being Custom and Conventionality. Imbued with a decent reverence for this Holy Triad an industrious writer may hope to produce books that will live as long as the fashion.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on custom, laws, religion, and sincerity

RITE, n. A religious or semi-religious ceremony fixed by law, precept or custom, with the essential oil of sincerity carefully squeezed out of it.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on custom, cynicism, improvement, and vision

CYNIC, n. A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be. Hence the custom among the Scythians of plucking out a cynic's eyes to improve his vision.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adolph Saphir on character, controversy, correction, custom, day, fatherhood, god, innovation, jesus, nations, and observation

There was no point of controversy between Jesus and the Jews; Jesus brought no new doctrine unto them. Jesus said, What the masters in Israel teach, what the Pharisees and the Scribes teach, is perfectly correct. There was no dogma which was the cause of controversy between Jesus and the nation; there was no new custom that Jesus introduced: He went into the Temple every day. He observed the ordinances and festivals of Israel. What was the subject of dispute and controversy between Jesus and the Jews? It was no doctrine, it was no innovation, it was Jesus Himself whom they rejected. There was an antipathy in them to the person of Jesus: it was the Lord Himself whom they hated, because they hated the Father. . . . But Jesus knew . . . that it was because He was one with the Father, because He was the express image of His being, because He was the perfect manifestation of the character of God, that they hated Him; and therefore Jesus was pained, not because they hated Him, but because they hated in Him the Father.

Adolph Saphir

Source: Christ and Israel

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content