curiosity

A Quote by Anatole France on art, curiosity, purpose, and teaching

The whole art of teaching is only the art of awakening the natural curiosity of young minds for the purpose of satisfying it afterwards.

Anatole France (1844 - 1924)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on animals, curiosity, museums, and vulgarity

MUMMY, n. An ancient Egyptian . . . handy, too, in museums in gratifying the vulgar curiosity that serves to distinguish man from the lower animals.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on curiosity, desires, masculinity, mind, quality, soul, and women

CURIOSITY, n. An objectionable quality of the female mind. The desire to know whether or not a woman is cursed with curiosity is one of the most active and insatiable passions of the masculine soul.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Alexander Smith on curiosity, garden, and heart

It is curious, pathetic almost, how deeply seated in the human heart is the liking for gardens and gardening.

Alexander Smith (1830 - 1867)

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A Quote by Alexander Pope on business, curiosity, and labor

One who is too wise an observer of the business of others, like one who is too curious in observing the labor of bees, will often be stung for his curiosity.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

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A Quote by Alexander Pope on curiosity and dogs

How do we know that we have a right to kill creatures that we are so little above, as dogs, for our curiosity or even for some use to us?

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

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A Quote by Alexander Pope on business, curiosity, labor, and niceness

A person who is too nice as an observer of the business of the crowd, like one who is too curious in observing the labor of bees, will often be stung for his curiosity.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Einstein on curiosity, facts, and miracles

It is, in fact, nothing short of a miracle that the modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiosity of inquiry.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.

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