culture

A Quote by Max Lerner on culture, death, and power

We cannot live by power, and a culture that seeks to live by it becomes brutal and sterile. But we can die without it.

Max Lerner (1902 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on culture, god, reason, and words

There is no better motto which it [culture] can have than these words of Bishop Wilson, "To make reason and the will of God prevail."

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Culture and Anarchy. P. 8.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on culture, thought, and world

Culture is "to know the best that has been said and thought in the world."

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on contentment, culture, and defense

'He knows', says Hebraism, 'his Bible!'-whenever we hear this said, we may, without any elaborate defense of culture, content ourselves with answering simply: 'No man, who knows nothing else, knows even his Bible.'

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Culture and Anarchy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marshall McLuhan on art, beginning, and culture

Art at its most significant is a Distant Early Warning System that can always be relied on to tell the old culture what is beginning to happen to it.

Marshall McLuhan (1911 - 1980)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Louis Nizer on culture, indifference, individuality, nations, people, skill, talent, and unity

Many people with different backgrounds, cultures, languages, and creeds combine to make a nation. But that nation is greater than the sum total of the individual skills and talents of its people. Something more grows out of their unity than can be calculated by adding the assets of individual contributions. That intangible additional quantity is often due to the differences which make the texture of the nation rich. Therefore, we must never wipe out or deride the differences amongst us-for where there is no difference, there is only indifference.

Louis Nizer (1902 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lord Raglan on culture

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Culture is roughly anything we do and the monkeys don't.

Lord Raglan

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lesslie Newbigin on acquaintance, agreement, christ, christianity, church, cities, civilization, community, control, culture, earth, family, force, god, home, individuality, jesus, jobs, loneliness, machines, men, nations, nature, neighbors, p

Western European civilization has witnessed a sort of atomizing process, in which the individual is more and more set free from his natural setting in family and neighborhood, and becomes a sort of replaceable unit in the social machine. His nearest neighbors may not even know his name. He is free to move from place to place, from job to job, from acquaintance to acquaintance, and - if he has attained a high degree of emancipation - from wife to wife. He is in every context a more and more anonymous and replaceable part, the perfect incarnation of the rationalist conception of man. Wherever western civilization has spread in the past one hundred years, it has carried this atomizing process with it. Its characteristic product in Calcutta, Shanghai, or Johannesburg, is the modern city into which myriads of human beings, loosened from their old ties in village or tribe or caste, like grains of sand fretted by water from an ancient block of sandstone, are ceaselessly churned around in the whirlpool of the city - anonymous, identical, replaceable units. In such a situation, it is natural that men should long for some sort of real community, for men cannot be human without it. It is especially natural that Christians should reach out after that part of Christian doctrine which speaks of the true, God-given community, the Church of Jesus Christ. We have witnessed the appalling results of trying to go back to some sort of primitive collectivity based on the total control of the individual, down t o the depths of his spirit, by an all-powerful group. Yet we know that we cannot condemn this solution to the problem of man's loneliness if we have no other to offer. It is natural that men should ask with a greater eagerness than ever before, such questions as these: "Is there in truth a family of God on earth to which I can belong, a place where all men can be truly at home? If so, where is it to be found, what are its marks, and how is it related to, and distinguished from, the known communities of family, nation, and culture? What are its boundaries, its structure, its terms of membership? And how comes it that those who claim to be the spokesmen of that one holy fellowship are themselves at war with one another as to the fundamentals of its nature, and unable to agree to live together in unity and concord?" The breakdown of Christendom has forced such questions as these to the front. I think that there is no more urgent theological task than to try to give them plain and credible answers.

Lesslie Newbigin

Source: The Household of God

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kate Millett on appearance, culture, power, and present

However muted its present appearance may be, sexual domination obtains nevertheless as perhaps the most pervasive ideology of our culture and provides its most fundamental concept of power.

Kate Millett (1934 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kate Millett on circumstances, culture, and life

Because of our social circumstances, male and female are really two cultures and their life experiences are utterly different.

Kate Millett (1934 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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