Critics

A Quote by Vanna Bonta on ridicule and critics

Ridicule is a public confession of fear.

Vanna Bonta

Contributed by: andre

A Quote by William Faulkner on critics, reviews, criticism, and focus

The artist doesn't have time to listen to the critics. The ones who want to be writers read the reviews, the ones who want to write don't have time to read reviews.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: andre

A Quote by Maya Angelou on critics and skill

Some critics will write 'Maya Angelou is a natural writer'  --  which is right after being a natural heart surgeon.

Maya Angelou (1928 -)

Contributed by: andre

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on critics, criticism, courage, doers, failure, and success

It is not the critic who counts. Not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause. Who, at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those timid souls who know neither victory or defeat.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Contributed by: andre

A Quote by Sol Luckman on literature, beginners luke, sol luckman, critics, immortality, organic, experience, complexity, transcendence, mundane origins, alchemy, alchemist, gold, base metals, and transmutation

Literature, at its best, and despite the recent attempts of critics, can never be murdered and dissected, as it’s an immortal yet organic thing, drawing on the richness and complexity of Experience yet somehow managing to transcend its mundane origins like an alchemist transmuting base metals.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 9

Contributed by: Alyce

A Quote by Avram Noam Chomsky on debate, inquiry, doctrine, crimes, critics, and respectability

"To achieve respectability, to be admitted to the debate, they must accept without question or inquiry the fundamental doctrine that the state is benevolent, governed by the loftiest intentions, adopting a defensive stance, not an actor in world affairs but only reacting to the crimes of others...If even the harshest of critics tacitly adopt these premises, then the ordinary person may ask, who am I to disagree?"

Noam Chomsky (1928 -)

Contributed by: Demian

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