criticism

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on concern, criticism, experience, fiction, imagination, kindness, life, sharing, tragedy, and work

However intense my experience, I am conscious of the presence and criticism of a part of me, which, as it were, is not a part of me, but a spectator, sharing no experience, but taking note of it, and that is no more I than it is you. When the lay, it may be the tragedy, of life is over, the spectator goes his way. It was a kind of fiction, a work of the imagination only, so far as he was concerned.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

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A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on bitterness, criticism, and truth

I am sorry to think that you do not get a man's most effective criticism until you provoke him. Severe truth is expressed with some bitterness.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

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A Quote by Heinrich Heine on criticism and praise

He only profits from praise who values criticism.

Heinrich Heine (1797 - 1856)

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A Quote by Heber J. Grant on ability, criticism, good, and heart

If a man has the assurance within his own heart that he is worthy, and that he is laboring to the best of his ability to do good, he can stand up under the condemnation, the criticism and the censure of those by whom he is surrounded.

Heber J. Grant (1856 - 1945)

Source: November 6, 1892

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A Quote by Guenther Bornkamm on christ, church, community, concern, criticism, facts, faith, history, jesus, liberty, libraries, life, past, time, traditions, truth, understanding, and words

Form-criticism has made an end of the false notion, which for a long time dominated critical scholarship, that it was possible throughout the gospels to distill from them a "Life of Jesus" that would be free from dogmatic presuppositions and not affected by any "retouching" derived from the faith of the Church. In fact, however, faith in Jesus Christ crucified and risen did not first appear at some later stage in the tradition, but was the foundation of the tradition, the very soil out of which it grew; and it is in light of that faith alone that the tradition can be understood. This faith in Jesus Christ, the Crucified and Exalted One, explains both the things which the primitive tradition makes known to us, with its manifest concern for the factual truth of the tradition about Jesus, and at the same time the peculiar liberty which the evangelists take in making alterations in the record in points of detail. In relating the acts and words of Jesus, they do not refer back to any sort of "archives" possessed by the community. . . . Jesus Christ is not for them a figure of past history whose proper place is in a library.

Guenther Bornkamm

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A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on appreciation, criticism, men, and work

There is no scorn more profound, or on the whole more justifiable, than that of the men who make for the men who explain. Exposition, criticism, appreciation, is work for second-rate minds.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Source: A Mathematician's Apology, London, Cambridge University Press, 1941.

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A Quote by Gilbert Keith Chesterton on cities, criticism, family, men, and sacred

Only men to whom the family is sacred will ever have a standard or a status by which to criticize the State. They alone can appeal to something more holy than the gods of the city.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874 - 1936)

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A Quote by Gilbert Keith Chesterton on criticism and words

Criticism is only words about words, and of what use are words about such words as these?

Gilbert Chesterton (1874 - 1936)

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A Quote by Franklin P. Jones on acquaintance, criticism, friendship, honesty, and relatives

Honest criticism is hard to take, particularly from a relative, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger.

Franklin P. Jones (1906 -)

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A Quote by Franklin D. Richards on ability, acceptance, circumstances, criticism, exercise, good, and patience

Sometimes we are misunderstood, even by those who are closest to us. Under such circumstances, patience will develop within us the capacity to accept criticism and censure, whether we feel such criticism is warranted or not. This ability to exercise forbearance under provocation means that we are following the Savior's teachings, to do good to those who despitefully use us and to turn the other cheek.

Franklin D. Richards (1900 - 1987)

Source: General Conference, April 1968.

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