criticism

A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on advertising, authors, books, christianity, confidence, criticism, direction, effort, family, good, hunger, life, mind, optimism, peace, propaganda, religion, success, thinking, and time

Some time ago a member of my family sent to me a critical article written by Mr. Edmund Fuller in a publication called Saturday Review. The criticism of the writer is directed against the effort made to satisfy what the author designates as "general religious hunger," with books, articles, and public appearances of nationally advertised individuals, carrying on a propaganda for what is characterized as (these are quotes) "the good life," "peace of mind," "positive thinking," and "successful" or "confident living." What the author objects to most strenuously is not so much that propaganda should be issued for the optimism of "peace of mind" and "positive thinking," but that this psychological optimism should be held out in any form as an interpretation of or a substitute for the real Christian religion.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1958, Pg.5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Kingsley William Amis on action, criticism, guidance, and virtue

Self criticism must be my guide to action, and the first rule for its employment is that in itself it is not a virtue, only a procedure.

Sir Kingsley William Amis (1922 - 1995)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Scott Raymond Adams on careers and criticism

It is better for your career to do nothing, than to do something and attract criticism.

Scott Raymond Adams (1957 -)

Source: Dogbert, in Building a Better Life by Stealing Office Supplies: Dogbert's Big Book of Business, 1991

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robin Evans on criticism

Never criticize a man until you've run a mile in his shoes. That way, if he doesn't like what you have to say, it'll be OK because you'll be a mile away and you'll have his shoes.

Robin Evans

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on criticism

Criticism should not be querulous and wasting, all knife and root-puller, but guiding, instructive, inspiring.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on criticism, expectation, and merit

In the firm expectation that when London shall be a habitation of bitterns, when St. Paul and Westminster Abbey shall stand shapeless and nameless ruins in the midst of an unpeopled marsh, when the piers of Waterloo Bridge shall become the nuclei of islets of reeds and osiers, and cast the jagged shadows of their broken arches on the solitary stream, some Transatlantic commentator will be weighing in the scales of some new and now unimagined system of criticism the respective merits of the Bells and the Fudges and their historians.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Source: Dedication to Peter Bell.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Oliver Heaviside on criticism, good, and understanding

Criticized for using formal mathematical manipulations, without understanding how they worked: Should I refuse a good dinner simply because I do not understand the process of digestion?

Oliver Heaviside (1850 - 1925)

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A Quote by Norman Vincent Peale on criticism, praise, and trouble

The trouble with most of us is that we would rather be ruined by praise than saved by criticism.

Norman Vincent Peale (1898 - 1993)

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A Quote by Cal Thomas on acceptance, america, audiences, babies, blindness, boldness, children, concern, country, criticism, death, decisions, dignity, generosity, good, heart, hunger, inclusion, life, love, motherhood, murder, nations, nobility, peace,

Mother Teresa Has Anti-Abortion Answer At a National Prayer Breakfast in Washington Feb. 3, Mother Teresa of Calcutta delivered the most startling and bold proclamation of truth to power I have heard in my more than 30 professional years in Washington. Before an audience of 3,000 - that included the president and his wife, the vice president and his wife and congressional leaders, among others - the 83-year old nun, who is physically frail but spiritually and rhetorically powerful, delivered an address that cut to the heart of the social ills afflicting America. She said that America, once known for generosity to the world, has become selfish. And she said that the greatest proof of that selfishness is abortion. Tying abortion to growing violence and murder in the streets, she said, "If we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill each other? . . . Any country that accepts abortion is not teaching its people to love, but to use any violence to get what they want." At that line, most of those in attendance erupted in a standing ovation, something that rarely occurs at these sedate events. At that moment, President Clinton quickly reached for his water glass, and Mrs. Clinton and Vice President and Mrs. Gore stared without expression at Mother Teresa. They did not applaud. It was clearly an uncomfortable moment on the dais. She then delivered the knockout punch: "Many people are very, very concerned with children in India, with the children of Africa where quite a few die of hunger, and so on. Many people are also concerned about all the violence in this great country of the United States. "These concerns are very good. But often these same people are not concerned with the millions who are being killed by the deliberate decision of their own mothers. And this is what is the greatest destroyer of peace today - abortion, which brings people to such blindness." What? Abortion destroys peace and causes blindness toward the sick, the hungry and the naked? Abortion leads to wars between nations? Of course it does, if life is regarded so lightly and its disposal becomes so trivial, so clinical and so easy. Why should people or nations regard human life as noble or dignified if abortion flourishes? Why agonize about indiscriminate death in Bosnia when babies are being killed far more efficiently and out of the sight of television cameras? Mother Teresa delivered her address without rhetorical flourishes. She never raised her voice or pounded the lectern. Her power was in her words and the selfless life she has led. Even President Clinton, in his remarks that followed, acknowledged she was beyond criticism because of the life she has lived in service to others. At the end, she pleaded for pregnant women who don't want their children to give them to her: "I am willing to accept any child who would be aborted and to give that child to a married couple who will love the child and be loved by the child." She said she has placed over 3,000 children in adoptive homes from her Calcutta headquarters alone. She has answered the question, "Who will care for all of these babies if abortion is again outlawed?" Now the question is whether a woman contemplating abortion wishes to be selfish or selfless, to take life or to give life.

Cal Thomas

Source: Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Salt Lake Tribune, Feb. 14, 1994

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mildred Howells on criticism

And so it criticized each flower, This supercilious seed; Until it woke one summer hour, And found itself a weed.

Mildred Howells

Source: The Different Seed

Contributed by: Zaady

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