country

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on country, depression, and fear

The thing that impresses me most about this country is its hopefulness. It is this which distinguishes it from Europe, where there is hopeless depression and fear.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Einstein on country, heroism, love, nonsense, and patriotism

Heroism on command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance, and all the loathsome nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism - how passionately I hate them!

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on contentment, country, happiness, heart, and losing

Into my heart an air that kills From yon far country blows: What are those blue remembered hills, What spires, what farms are those? That is the land of lost content I see it shining plain The happy highways where I went And cannot come again.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: A Shropshire Lad, 1896, no. 40, st. 1,2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on aggression, america, anger, army, blessings, camping, citizenship, conflict, country, day, defense, disobedience, divinity, failure, fatherhood, freedom, gifts, god, harmony, heart, heaven, humility, laws, libraries, mercy,

From the collection of Lincoln's papers in the Library of America series, Vol II, pp. 520-521. The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defense, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle, or the ship; the axe had enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battlefield; and the country, rejoicing in the consciousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Proclamation of Thanksgiving, Address, October 3, 1863

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on companions, country, and horses

I have not permitted myself, gentlemen, to conclude that I am the best man in the country; but I am reminded, in this connection, of a story of an old Dutch farmer who remarked to a companion once that "it was not best to swap horses while crossing streams."

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Reply to Delegation from the National Union League, June 9, 1864

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on confidence, country, exercise, existence, government, hope, justice, patience, people, and world

This country, with its institutions, belongs to the people who inhabit it. Whenever they shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it. Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better or equal hope in the world?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: 1861

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on agreement, confusion, country, justice, and time

The story of a jackass Lincoln owned as a young man: The case of that jackass was most singular. When everything was pleasant all around he would kick the worst. When his rack was fullest and his stall fixed with new straw and everything real comfortable, that jackass would start in on the almightiest spell of kicking that was ever seen. All the veterinary surgeons in the neighborhood came and tried to find out just what made the critter kick so. They never could agree about it. One thing we all noticed was that he always brayed and kicked at the same time. Sometimes he would bray first and then kick, but other times he would kick first and then bray, so that confused us, and nobody in that whole country was ever able to find out whether that jackass was braying at his own kick or kicking at his own brays.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Campaign for Congress, Sangamon, Illinois, 1854

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on business, confidence, country, friendship, losing, nations, people, thought, wives, and women

I think very much of the people, as an old friend said he thought of woman. He said when he lost his first wife, who had been a great help to him in his business, he thought he was ruined - that he could never find another to fill her place. At length, however, he married another, who he found did quite as well as the first, and that his opinion now was that any woman would do well who was well done by. So I think of the whole people of this nation - they will ever do well if well done by. We will try to do well by them in all parts of the country, North and South, with entire confidence that all will be well with all of us.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: remarks at as president-elect Bloomington, Illinois, November 21, 1860.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on citizenship, country, difficulty, earth, freedom, generations, giving, history, honor, hope, past, power, quiet, responsibility, slavery, present, and world

The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country. Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down in honor or dishonor to the latest generation. We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free - honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope of earth.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Address to the Congress of the United States, Dec. 1, 1862

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on ability, belief, citizenship, country, departure, gold, ideas, interest, life, mountains, nations, prosperity, war, wealth, and world

I have very large ideas of the mineral wealth of our Nation. I believe it practically inexhaustible. It abounds all over the western country, from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific, and its development has scarcely commenced. . . . Immigration, which even the war has not stopped, will land upon our shores hundred of thousands more per year from overcrowded Europe. I intend to point them to the gold and silver that waits for them in the West. Toll the miners from me, that I shall promote their interests to the utmost of my ability; because their prosperity is the prosperity of the Nation, and we shall prove in a very few years that we are indeed the treasury of the world. Message for the miners of the West, delivered verbally to Speaker of the House Schuyler Colfax, who was about to depart on a trip to the West, in the afternoon of April 14, 1865, before Lincoln left for Ford's Theatre. Colfax delivered the message to a large crowd of citizens in Denver, Colorado, May 27, 1865. -Edward Winslow Martin, The Life and Public Services of Schuyler Colfax, pp. 187-88 (1868).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: message for the miners of the West (SEE BELOW)

Contributed by: Zaady

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