correction

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on absence, advice, attitude, church, circumstances, correction, facts, family, fear, force, friendship, giving, heart, leadership, listening, losing, love, past, pride, resentment, solution, and truth

In moments of truth, when meekness matters, other forces, including pride, flow into the chemistry of that moment. Take, for instance, the matter of receiving correct counsel, whether given by a spouse, a family member, a friend, or a Church leader. Often the counsel, even when spoken in love, is resisted by the recipient who - chained by pride - focuses instead upon the imperfections of the person giving the counsel. In another situation, the recipient may have much pride in the position he or she has already taken and refuse to deny himself or herself the continuation of that conduct, lifestyle, or attitude, which denial is at the heart of the solution. However, those who fear losing face cannot have His image in their countenances. In yet another circumstance, the recipient may, instead of listening to the counsel given, be nursing some past grievance upon which he or she would prefer to focus rather than the real issue at hand. Neither advice-giver nor circumstances can be perfect. Absent mutual meekness, the counsel given may not only go unheeded, but, in fact, may even be resented. Italics added.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Meek and Lowly, p. 57., © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Moses Thatcher on correction, deception, failure, fear, life, senses, and spirit

The sight of the eye, the hearing of the ear, the touch of the hand may each and all be deceived, but the instructions of the spirit are in all things correct. The combined senses may misguide or fail, but he who happily secures the companionship of the Holy Spirit, walks in the ways of life and neither fears, becomes weary nor faints by the wayside.

Moses Thatcher (1842 - 1909)

Source: Journal of Discourses 23:196

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Morarji Ranchhodji Desai on belief, correction, cruelty, and life

You are quite correct in saying that I banned the export of monkeys on a humanitarian basis and not because the number was lessening. I believe in preventing cruelty to all living beings in any form.

Morarji Ranchhodji Desai (1896 - 1995)

Source: Letter to the International Primate Protection League, 16 April 1985.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Molefi Kete Asante on correction and people

What could be any more correct for any people than to see with their own eyes?

Molefi Kete Asante (1942 -)

Source: Famous Black Quotations, ed. Janet Cheatham Bell, 1995.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Michio Kaku on correction, facts, and theory

It is often stated that of all the theories proposed in this century, the silliest is quantum theory. In fact, some say that the only thing that quantum theory has going for it is that it is unquestionably correct.

Michio Kaku

Source: Michio Kaku Hyperspace, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 263.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on correction, legacy, struggle, and study

In the struggle to defend the legacy of Leninism . . . [Stalin] proved himself to be an outstanding Marxist-Leninist fighter. . . . Stalin's works should, as before, be seriously studied . . . [to] see what is correct and what is not.

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: On the Historical Experience of the Dictatorship of the Proletariat (1956)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on correction, deception, evil, existence, faults, good, love, and self-love

Self-love makes us deceive ourselves in almost all matters, to censure others, and to blame them for the same faults that we do not correct in ourselves; we do this either because we are unaware of the evil that exists within us, or because we always see our own evil disguised as a good.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on correction and learning

Mean-spirited mediocrities, especially those with a smattering of learning, are the most likely to be opinionated. Only strong minds know how to correct their opinions and abandon a bad position.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by L.T. Danshiell on animals, correction, cruelty, integrity, laws, and people

Show me the enforced laws of a state for the prevention of cruelty to animals and I in turn will give you a correct estimate of the refinement, enlightenment, integrity and equity of that commonwealth's people.

L.T. Danshiell (1914 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Count Leo Nikolaevich Tolstoi or Tolstoy on achievement, aim, art, conformity, correction, errors, history, hope, humanity, individuality, justice, laws, mathematics, mind, observation, problems, separation, solution, understanding, and yieldi

A modern branch of mathematics, having achieved the art of dealing with the infinitely small, can now yield solutions in other more complex problems of motion, which used to appear insoluble. This modern branch of mathematics, unknown to the ancients, when dealing with problems of motion, admits the conception of the infinitely small, and so conforms to the chief condition of motion (absolute continuity) and thereby corrects the inevitable error which the human mind cannot avoid when dealing with separate elements of motion instead of examining continuous motion. In seeking the laws of historical movement just the same thing happens. The movement of humanity, arising as it does from innumerable human wills, is continuous. To understand the laws of this continuous movement is the aim of history. Only by taking an infinitesimally small unit for observation (the differential of history, that is, the individual tendencies of man) and attaining to the art of integrating them (that is, finding the sum of these infinitesimals) can we hope to arrive at the laws of history.

Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910)

Source: War and Peace.

Contributed by: Zaady

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