contentment

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on contentment and dictatorship

The German dictator, instead of snatching the victuals from the table, has been content to have them served to him course by course.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Speech on the Munich agreement, House of Commons, October 5, 1938

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on army, contentment, idleness, lust, machines, military, rest, work, and world

Hitler is a monster of wickedness, insatiable in his lust for blood and plunder. Not content with having all Europe under his heel, or else terrorized into various forms of abject submission, he must now carry his work of butchery and desolation among the vast multitudes of Russia and of Asia. The terrible military machine, which we and the rest of the civilized world so foolishly, so supinely, so insensately allowed the Nazi gangsters to build up year by year from almost nothing cannot stand idle lest it rust or fall to pieces. . . . So now this bloodthirsty guttersnipe must launch his mechanized armies upon new fields of slaughter, pillage and devastation.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Radio broadcast on the German invasion of Russia, June 1941

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment and heart

My crown is in my heart, not on my head; Not deck'd with diamonds and Indian stones, Nor to be seen: my crown is call'd content; A crown it is that seldom kings enjoy.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI, Part iii, Act 3, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment

Poor and content is rich and rich enough.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: OTHELLO, Act 3, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment, day, and endings

All is well ended if this suit be won. That you express content; which we will pay, With strife to please you, day exceeding day.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: All’s Well That Ends Well, Act 5, scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment, envy, good, happiness, and men

I am a true laborer: I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness, glad of other men's good, content with my harm.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act III, Scene ii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment, envy, good, happiness, men, and pride

Sir, I am a true laborer: I earn that I eat, get that I wear,owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness, glad of other men's good, content with my harm, and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and my lambs suck.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: AS YOU LIKE IT, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, contentment, friendship, good, learning, money, nature, philosophy, and wit

Hast any philosophy in thee shepherd? .• • • • . . . He that wants money, means and content, is without three good friends; that the property of rain is to wet and fire to burn; that good pasture makes fat sheep, and a great cause of the night is lack of the sun; that he that hath learned no wit by nature nor art may complain of good breeding or comes of a very dull kindred.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: AS YOU LIKE IT, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William S. Ogdon on art, birds, character, clarity, conscience, contentment, control, determination, discovery, economics, effort, enemies, ethics, fashion, goodness, government, happiness, heart, individuality, life, listening, luxury, money,

The Art of Happiness There was never a time when so much official effort was being expended to produce happiness, and probably never a time when so little attention was paid by the individual to creating and personal qualities that make for it. What one misses most today is the evidence of widespread personal determination to develop a character that will, in itself, given any reasonable odds, make for happiness. Our whole emphasis is on the reform of living conditions, of increased wages, of controls on the economic structure-the government approach-and so little on man improving himself. The ingredients of happiness are so simple that they can be counted on one hand. Happiness comes from within, and rests most securely on simple goodness and clear conscience. Religion may not be essential to it, but no one ins known to have gained it without a philosophy resting on ethical principles. Selfishness is its enemy; to make another happy is to be happy one's self. It is quiet, seldom found for long in crowds, most easily won in moments of solitude and reflection. It cannot be bought; indeed, money has very little to do with it. No one is happy unless he is reasonably well satisfied with himself, so that the quest for tranquility must of necessity begin with self-examination. We shall not often be content with what we discover in this scrutiny. There is much to do, and so little done. Upon this searching self-analysis, however, depends the discovery of those qualities that make each man unique, and whose development alone can bring satisfaction. Of all those who have tried, down the ages, to outline a program for happiness, few have succeeded so well as William Henry Channing, chaplain of the House of Representatives in the middle of the last century: "To live content with small means; so seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy . . . to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to the stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never; in a word to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common." It will be noted that no government can do this for you; you must do it for yourself.

William S. Ogdon

Source: New York Times, Editorial Page, Dec. 30, 1945

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Pitt, "the Elder Pitt on contentment, crime, experience, honor, spirit, and youth

The atrocious crime of being a young man, which the honourable gentleman [Walpole] has with such spirit and decency charged upon me, I shall neither attempt to palliate nor deny; but content myself with wishing that I may be one of those whose follies may cease with their youth, and not of that number who are ignorant in spite of experience.

William Pitt (1708 - 1778)

Source: Speech, House of Commons, March 1741

Contributed by: Zaady

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