consumption

A Quote by Yvon Chouinard on sustainability, conscious business, conscious capitalism, business, cradel to cradle, consumption, and recycling

...we've teamed up with some Japanese companies to, basically by 2010, make all our clothing out of recycled and recyclable fibers. And we're going to accept ownership of our products from birth to birth. So if you buy a jacket from us, or a shirt ,or a pair of pants, when you're done with it, you can give it back to us and we'll make more shirts and pants out of it.

Which is a different idea about consuming. Right now the world runs on consuming and discarding, and we're saying that we're taking responsibility for our products from birth to birth. Can you imagine if a computer company said, "When you're done with your computer, we'll buy it back from you and make more computers out of it." Instead, they sell you computer and you can't even get service from them!

It's a different way of accepting responsibility.

Yvon Chouinard

Source: The TH Interview: Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia (Part One): http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/02/the_th_interview_yvon_chouinard.php

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Ven Payutto on production, consumption, economics, and buddhist

The word "production" is misleading. We tend to think that through production new things are created, when in fact it is merely changes of state which are effected. One substance or form of energy is converted into another. These conversions entail the creation of a new state by the destruction of an old one. Thus production is always accompanied by destruction. In some cases the destruction is acceptable, in others it is not. Production is only truly justified when the value of the thing produced outweighs the value of that which is destroyed. In some cases it may be better to refrain from production. This is invariably true for those industries whose products are for the purpose of destruction. In weapons factories, for example, non-production is always the better choice. In industries where production entails the destruction of natural resources and environmental degradation, non-production is sometimes the better choice. To choose, we must distinguish between production with positive results and production with negative results; production that enhances well-being and that which destroys it.

Ven Payutto

Source: Buddhist Economics: A Middle Way for the Market Place

Contributed by: Siona

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