constitution

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on books, constitution, learning, nature, soul, thinking, value, and world

Hence, instead of Man Thinking, we have the bookworm. Hence, the book-learned class, who value books, as such; not as related to nature and the human constitution, but as making a sort of Third Estate with the world and the soul. Hence, the restorers of readings, the emendators, the bibliomaniacs of all degrees. . . .

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: The American Scholar from Addresses, published as part of Nature; Addresses and Lectures

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on constitution, good, and names

Good and bad are but names very readily transferable to that or this; the only right is what is after my constitution, the only wrong is against it.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on constitution, desires, and nature

There is nothing capricious in nature and the implanting of a desire indicates that its gratification is in the constitution of the creature that feels it.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on constitution and needs

Every man is a consumer, and ought to be a producer. . . . He is by constitution expensive, and needs to be rich.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Patrick Jake "P.J." O'Rourke on america, constitution, country, justice, order, people, reason, television, and welfare

The preamble to the Constitution states: "We, the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare..." It doesn't say "guarantee the general welfare." And it certainly doesn't say "give welfare benefits to all the people in the country who aren't doing so well even if the reason they aren't doing so well is because they're sitting on their butts in front of the TV.

P.J. O'Rourke (1947 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Philip D. Reed on action, america, constitution, debt, economics, freedom, government, honor, people, respect, separation, speech, understanding, and worship

A PRIMER OF AMERICAN SELF-GOVERNMENT I. Understand, honor and preserve the Constitution of the United States. 2. Keep forever separate and distinct the legislative, executive and judicial functions of government. 3. Remember that government belongs to the people, is inherently inefficient, and that its activities should be limited to those which government alone can perform. 4. Be vigilant for freedom of speech, freedom of worship, and freedom of action. 5. Cherish the system of Free Enterprise which made America great. 6. Respect thrift and economy, and beware of debt. 7. Above all, let us be scrupulous in keeping our word and in respecting the rights of others.

Philip D. Reed

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A Quote by Patrick Henry on argument, caution, constitution, evil, government, presidency, style, and world

Patrick Henry opposed the federal Constitution not only because it lacked a Bill of Rights in its unamended form, but also because it would establish a "consolidated government" rather than a confederation of states. It is proper to note George F. Willison's caution that "[s]peeches by Henry and others, as reported, were approximations of what was said. . . . The 'shorthand gentlemen' of the convention did not attempt a verbatim report of everything that was said. Rather, they reported the lines of argument, the special points that were made, but their notes did manage to convey something of the style of the various speakers, picking up and preserving many of their more graphic phrases." (George F. Willison, Patrick Henry and His World, 1969) "The Constitution is said to have beautiful features; but when I come to examine these features, Sir, they appear to me horribly frightful. Among other deformities, it has an awful squinting - it squints towards monarchy. And does not this raise indignation in the breast of every true American? Your president may easily become king. . . . Where are your checks in this government? . . . I would rather infinitely - and I am sure most of this convention are of the same opinion - have a king, lords, and commons than a government so replete with such insupportable evils."

Patrick Henry (1736 - 1799)

Source: at the Virginia convention for constitutional ratification, June, 1788

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A Quote by Oliver Wendell Holmes on agreement, constitution, freedom, principles, thought, and attachment

If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought; not free thought for those who agree with us, but freedom for the thought that we hate.

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

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A Quote by Nikolai Lenin on citizenship, constitution, nationality, and sex

The constitution of Soviet Russia must insure equal rights for all citizens regardless of sex, creed, race, or nationality.

Nikolai Lenin (1870 - 1924)

Source: 1917

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A Quote by Michael Gartner on change, constitution, country, military, police, and reason

There is no reason for anyone in this country, anyone except a police officer or a military person, to buy, to own, to have, to use a handgun. . . . And the only way to do that is to change the Constitution.

Michael Gartner

Source: 1992, in USA Today

Contributed by: Zaady

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