constitution

A Quote by unknown on citizenship, constitution, crime, honesty, needs, privacy, reason, and time

No private citizen has any reason or need at any time to possess a gun. This applies to both honest citizens and criminals. We realize the Constitution guarantees the "right to keep and bear arms" but this should be changed.

unknown

Source: a Detroit newspaper, 1968

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on blessings, constitution, foolishness, god, inspiration, liberty, nations, obedience, repentance, sorrow, survival, and trust

To trust in the arm of flesh is foolishness; to suppose that we are self-sufficient is naive. This nation will survive and prosper only as God permits it to do so, and his permission rests upon our obedience to him and his gospel. He brought forth this nation. He gave us our liberty. He inspired our federal constitution. But it is for us to preserve these priceless blessings by our repentance and obedience to God. Our sins and haughty attitudes can only bring us sorrow.

unknown

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thurgood Marshall on constitution and freedom

Today's Constitution is a realistic document of freedom only because of several corrective amendments. Those amendments speak to a sense of decency and fairness that I and other Blacks cherish.

Thurgood Marshall (1908 - 1993)

Source: We The People, 1987.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thucydides on achievement, authority, constitution, control, democracy, excellence, funerals, justice, laws, life, obedience, oppression, play, privacy, reason, security, shame, spirit, and talent

Our constitution is named a democracy, because it is in the hands not of the few but of the many. But our laws secure equal justice for all in their private disputes, and our public opinion welcomes and honors talent in every branch of achievement, not for any sectional reason but on grounds of excellence alone. And as we give free play to all in our public life, so we carry the same spirit into our daily relations with one another. . . . Open and friendly in our private intercourse, in our public acts we keep strictly within the control of law. We acknowledge the restraint of reverence; we are obedient to whomsoever is set in authority, and to the laws, more sepecially to those which offer protection to the oppressed and those unwritten ordinances whose transgression brings admitted shame. lb. II, Funeral Oration of Pericles, 37

Thucydides (c.460 - 400 BC)

Source: The History of the Peloponnesian War, 431—413 BC., bk. II, Funeral Oration of Pericles, 37

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on constitution, facts, life, and practice

If some period be not fixed, either by the Constitution or by practice, to the services of the First Magistrate, his office, though nominally elective, will, in fact, be for life, and that will soon degenerate into an inheritance.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on borrowing, constitution, government, money, power, war, and wishes

I wish it were possible to obtain a single amendment to our Constitution. I would be willing to depend on that alone for the reduction of the administration of our government; I mean an additional article taking from the Federal Government the power of borrowing. I now deny their power of making paper money or anything else a legal tender. I know that to pay all proper expenses within the year would, in case of war, be hard on us. But not so hard as ten wars instead of one. For wars could be reduced in that proportion; besides that the State governments would be free to lend their credit in borrowing quotas.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on belief, constitution, feeling, instinct, and justice

I believe that justice is instinct and innate, the moral sense is as much a part of our constitution as the threat of feeling, seeing and hearing.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tenche Coxe on birth, congress, constitution, god, government, military, people, power, soldiers, and trust

While the states were considering ratification of the Constitution: Who are the militia? are they not ourselves. Is it feared, then, that we shall turn our arms each man against his own bosom. Congress have no power to disarm the militia. Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birth-right of an American. . . . The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people.

Tenche Coxe (1638 - 1896)

Source: The Pennsylvania Gazette, Feb. 20, 1788

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Supreme Court on authority, certainty, congress, constitution, laws, and power

Even where Congress has the authority under the Constitution to pass laws requiring or prohibiting certain acts, it lacks the power directly to compel the States to require or prohibit those acts.

Supreme Court

Source: U.S. Supreme Court, 1992, New York v. United States, 505 U.S. 144

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on achievement, alienation, authors, certainty, constitution, daughters, divinity, eternity, exercise, fatherhood, fighting, gifts, god, good, history, independence, laws, liberty, men, nobility, principles, slavery, sons,

I have read and heard a good many statements by eminent writers and speakers to the effect that our liberty of which we are justly proud is an achievement, and not a gift. In the sense that it had to be worked for, fought for, and preserved with vigilance these statements are true. But let it never be forgotten that our concept of liberty is a gift. No human is the author of that concept. Many great men have so recognized it as did Thomas Jefferson when he wrote the Declaration of Independence and declared that "men are endowed with certain inalienable rights." Why are these rights inalienable? Because men did not create the right to liberty! In the exercise of his free agency he may surrender his privileges, and his property, and he may become the slave of others or of the state, but his free agency is as native to him as the air he breathes. It is part and parcel of his eternal constitution, and Jefferson was "righter than I think he himself knew" when he declared it an endowment which cannot be alienated. The message which we bear affirms that God is the Author of our inalienable liberty; that men, all men are of noble lineage, sons and daughters of the Eternal Father; and that liberty is their birthright. I thank God that . . . noble men were blessed with this lofty concept of man's inherent right to liberty and that they were prompted to incorporate these divine principles in the organic law and history of our favored land.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1947.

Contributed by: Zaady

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