conscience

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on ability, awareness, choice, conscience, day, decisions, empowerment, imagination, independence, learning, management, and self-awareness

In addition to self-awareness, imagination and conscience, it is the fourth human endowment-independent will-that really makes effective self-management possible. It is the ability to make decisions and choices and to act in accordance with them. It is the ability to act rather than to be acted upon, to proactively carry out the program we have developed through the other three endowments. Empowerment comes from learning how to use this great endowment in the decisions we make every day.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Woodrow Wilson on conscience, dogs, and home

If a dog will not come to you after he has looked you in the face, you ought to go home and examine your conscience.

Woodrow Wilson (1856 - 1924)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on action, conscience, failure, fate, guidance, history, honor, hope, life, memory, passion, past, play, sincerity, trying, and worth

History with its flickering lamp stumbles along the trail of the past, trying to reconstruct its scenes, to revive its echoes, and kindle with pale gleams the passion of former days. What is the worth of all this? The only guide to a man is his conscience; the only shield to his memory is the rectitude and sincerity of his actions. It is very imprudent to walk through life without this shield, because we are so often mocked by the failure of our hopes and the upsetting of our calculations; but with this shield, however the fate may play, we march always in the ranks of honor.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Tribute to Neville Chamberlain, House of Commons, November 1940

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on community, conscience, evolution, individuality, and rules

Conscience is the guardian in the individual of the rules which the community has evolved for its own preservation.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Source: The Moon and Sixpence, 1919, ch. 14

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on conscience

My conscience hath a thousand several tongues. And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: KING RICHARD III, Act 5, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on conscience and cowardice

O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: KING RICHARD III, Act 5, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on conscience, cowardice, resolution, and thought

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is slicked o'er with the pale cast of thought,

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on conscience and cowardice

Conscience is but a word that cowards use, Devised at first to keep the strong in awe.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: KING RICHARD III, Act 5, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on cities, conscience, cowardice, danger, gold, lies, obstacles, persuasion, reward, spirit, trust, and wives

FIRST MURDERER: WHERE IS THY CONSCIENCE NOW? SECOND MURDERER: In the Duke of Gloucester's purse FIRST MURDERER: So when he opens his purse to give us our reward, thy conscience flies out. SECOND MURDERER: Let it go; there's few or none will entertain it. FIRST MURDERER: How if it come to thee again? SECOND MURDERER: I'll not meddle with it: it is a dangerous thing: it makes a man a coward: a man cannot steal, but it accuseth him; he cannot swear, but it checks him; he cannot lie with his neighbour's wife, but it detects him: it is a blushing shamefast spirit that multiplies in a man's bosom; it fills one full of obstacles: it made me once restore a purse of gold, that I found: it beggars any man that keeps it: it is turned out of all towns and cities for a dangerous thing; and every man that means to live well, endeavours to trust to himself and to live without it. FIRST MURDERER: 'Zounds, it is even now at my elbow, persuading me not to kill the duke.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act I, scene iv

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, conscience, country, cowardice, death, delay, dreams, fortune, heart, laws, life, love, merit, mind, mortality, patience, questions, resolution, respect, sleep, suffering, thought, time, trouble, and wishes

To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die: to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause. There's the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips an scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of dispriz'd love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have, Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience doth make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pitch and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action. Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember'd.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

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