conquest

A Quote by Daniel Webster on company, conquest, earth, glory, military, possessions, power, principles, purpose, questions, and suffering

On this question of principle, while actual suffering was yet afar off, they [the Colonies] raised their flag against a power to which, for purposes of foreign conquest and subjugation, Rome in the height of her glory is not to be compared,-a power which has dotted over the surface of the whole globe with her possessions and military posts, whose morning drum-beat, following the sun, and keeping company with the hours, circles the earth with one continuous and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England.

Daniel Webster (1782 - 1852)

Source: Speech, May 7, 1834. Webster's Works. Boston. 1857, P. 110.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Cordell Hull on army, conquest, defense, effort, military, planning, security, surprises, time, and war

Secretary of State under Roosevelt, testifying before the Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack in regard to remarks he had made to the War Council on November 28, 1941. I emphasized that in my opinion the Japanese were likely to break out at any time with new acts of conquest and that the matter of safeguarding our national security was in the hands of the Army and the Navy. With due deference I expressed my judgement that any plans for our military defense should include an assumption that the Japanese might make the element of surprise a central point in their strategy and also might attack at various points simultaneously with a view to demoralizing efforts of defense and of coordination.

Cordell Hull (1871 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Southwick on attitude, conquest, destruction, ethics, responsibility, and spirit

Our moral and ethical responsibility is to protect other species in the spirit of husbandry rather than destroy them in and attitude of conquest.

Charles Southwick

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bartolomé de Las Casas on ambition, animals, belief, christianity, citizenship, concern, conquest, diet, experience, facts, god, greed, heaven, knowledge, murder, people, reason, simplicity, soul, truth, and violence

No "revisionist" historian of recent decades has excoriated the Spanish Conquest more thoroughly than Bartolomé de Las Casas, a contemporary of Columbus and the first priest to be ordained in the Americas: "The reason the Christians have murdered on such a vast scale and killed anyone and everyone in their way is purely and simply greed. . . . Their insatiable greed and overweening ambition know no bounds; the land is fertile and rich, the inhabitants simple, forbearing and submissive. The Spaniards have shown not the slightest consideration for these people, treating them (and I speak from first-hand experience, having been there from the outset) not as brute animals - indeed, I would to God they had done and had shown them the consideration they afford their animals - so much as piles of dung in the middle of the road. They have had as little concern for their souls as for their bodies, all the millions that perished having gone to their deaths with no knowledge of God and without the benefit of the Sacraments. One fact in all this is widely known and beyond dispute, for even the tyrannical murderers themselves acknowledge the truth of it: the indigenous peoples never did the Europeans any harm whatever; on the contrary, they believed them to have descended from the heavens, at least until they or their fellow citizens had tasted, at the hands of these oppressors, a diet of robbery, murder, violence, and all other manner of trials and tribulations."

Bartolome de Las Casas (1474 - 1566)

Source: Historia de las Indias, written 1550-1563

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu on conquest, difficulty, and honor

The honor of the conquest is rated by the difficulty.

Baron de Montesquieu (1689 - 1755)

Source: Pensées Diverses

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by André Malraux on america, conquest, effort, generations, history, energy, nations, power, and world

In the course of history, all empires have been created with premeditation, by an effort often sustained over several generations. Every power has been Roman to a degree. The United States is the first nation to become the most powerful in the world without having sought to be so. Its exceptional energy and organization have never been oriented toward conquest.

Andre Malraux (1901 - 1976)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alvin R. Dyer on conquest, day, earth, education, god, newspapers, science, scientists, and trust

When the Russians succeeded in putting the first satellite into orbit, one of their scientists is reported to have said, "Now that we have conquered space, our next conquest is that of man." An American anthropologist, Leslie A. White, of the University of Michigan, is reported in a Detroit newspaper as saying, "A cultural system which can launch earth satellites can dispense with Gods entirely." This is a great day for the false scientist-they who have left God out of their education. Of these the Apostle Paul even in his day warned his weakening convert, Timothy, to beware of: O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding profane and vain babblings, and oppositions of science falsely so called. (I Timothy 6 :20.)

Alvin R. Dyer (1903 - 1977)

Source: at BYU, April 7, 1964

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Adler on conquest, emotion, experience, feeling, inferiority, and violence

The greater the feeling of inferiority that has been experienced, the more powerful is the urge to conquest and the more violent the emotional agitation.

Alfred Adler (1870 - 1937)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adam Smith on america, beginning, conquest, discovery, economics, gold, injustice, prophets, and thought

Modern critics of the Conquest have an unlikely ally in the eighteenth-century prophet of laissez-faire economics: "It is not by the importation of gold and silver, that the discovery of America has enriched Europe. ...The commodities of Europe were almost all new to America, and many of those of America were new to Europe. A new set of exchanges, therefore, began t o take place which had never been thought of before, and which should naturally have proved as advantageous to the new, as it certainly did to the old continent. The savage injustice of the Europeans rendered an event, which ought to have been beneficial to all, ruinous and destructive to several of those unfortunate countries."

Adam Smith

Source: The Wealth of Nations, 1776

Contributed by: Zaady

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