conquest

A Quote by Paulo Coelho on happiness, blessing, magic, moment, and conquest

Sometimes happiness is a blessing, but generally it is a conquest. Each day's magic moment helps.

Paulo Coelho

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Sam Keen on war, wounded, sissies, sword, test, men, conquest, dying, sensitive, and fight

Men have all been culturally designed with conquest, killing, or dying in mind. Even sissies. Early in life a boy learns that he must be prepared to fight or be called a sissy, a girl. Many of the creative men I know were sissies. They were too sensitive, too compassionate, to fight. And most of them grew up feeling they were somehow inferior and flunked the manhood test. I suspect many writers are still showing the bullies on the block that the pen is mightier than the sword. The test shaped us, whether we passed or flunked.
We are all war-wounded.

Sam Keen

Source: Fire in the Belly (1991)

Contributed by: bajarbattu

A Quote by Robert Anson Heinlein on censorship, tyranny, oppression, propaganda, freedom, and conquest

When any government, or any church for that matter, undertakes to say to its subjects, "This you may not read, this you must not see, this you are forbidden to know," the end result is tyranny and oppression, no matter how holy the motives. Mighty little force is needed to control a man whose mind has been hoodwinked; contrariwise, no amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. No, not the rack, not fission bombs, not anything—you can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him.

Robert Heinlein (1907 - 1988)

Source: "If This Goes On—", Revolt in 2100

Contributed by: CajunGypsy

A Quote by Paulo Coelho on love, history, politics, war, theory, and conquest

History will never change because of politics or conquests or theories or wars; that's mere repitition, it's been going on since the beginning of time.  History will only change when we are able to use the energy of love, just as we use energy of the wind, the seas, the atom.

Paulo Coelho

Source: The Zahir: A Novel of Obsession, Pages: 91

Contributed by: Allison

A Quote by William Shakespeare on conquest and shame

That England, that was wont to conquer others, Hath made a shameful conquest of itself.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William George Jordan on action, conquest, dignity, freedom, future, gifts, growth, individuality, mistakes, power, privilege, progress, and wisdom

Mistakes are the inevitable accompaniment of the greatest gift given to man, - individual freedom of action. Let us be glad of the dignity of our privilege to make mistakes, glad of the wisdom that enables us to recognize them, glad of the power that permits us to turn their light as a glowing illumination along the pathway of our future. Mistakes are the growing pains of wisdom. Without them there would be no individual growth, no progress, no conquest.

William Jordan

Source: The Power of Purpose, pp. 21-22.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Savage Landor on composers, conquest, and joy

I sometimes think that the most plaintive ditty has brought a fuller joy and of longer duration to its composer that the conquest of Persia to the Macedonian.

Walter Savage Landor (1775 - 1864)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on conquest, habits, life, and pleasure

There is no pleasure in life equal to that of the conquest of a vicious habit.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on confusion, conquest, and idleness

Ruin seize thee, ruthless king! Confusion on thy banners wait! Though fann'd by Conquest's crimson wing, They mock the air with idle state.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Bard. I. 1, Line 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

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