congress

A Quote by John Adams on men, law, lawyers, congress, government, and fools

I have come to the conclusion that one useless man is called a disgrace, two useless men are called a law firm, and three or more become a Congress.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: attributed to one of America's founders, John Adams, in the play 1776

Contributed by: blue dragon

A Quote by unknown on government, united states, congress, and progress

If "con" is negative, and "pro" is positive, why is the United States run by congress, yet we never progress?

unknown

Contributed by: Angie

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on approval, congress, and meetings

Here Churchill repeats with approval a statement he had first made in January, 1930 "at a meeting at the Cannon Street Hotel." "Sooner or later you will have to crush Gandhi and the Indian Congress and all they stand for."

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: speaking before the House of Commons, April 29, 1932

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Rawle on blindness, congress, constitution, people, power, and prohibition

The prohibition is general. No clause in the constitution could by any rule of construction be conceived to give congress a power to disarm the people. Such a flagitious attempt could only be made under some general pretence by a state legislature. But if in any blind pursuit of inordinate power, either should attempt it, this amendment may be appealed to as a restraint on both.

William Rawle (1759 - 1837)

Source: A View of the Constitution of the United States of America (1829), constitutional law textbook

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Will Rogers on congress, death, taxes, and time

The difference between death and taxes is death doesn't get worse every time Congress meets."

Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Will Rogers on congress and money

We have the best Congress money can buy.

Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Will Rogers on congress and good

There is good news from Washington today. Congress is deadlocked and can't act.

Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)

Source: 1962 in Saturday Review

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on america, congress, government, politics, problems, and prohibition

We held in New York [v. United States] that Congress cannot compel the States to enact or enforce a federal regulatory program. Today we hold that Congress cannot circumvent that prohibition by conscripting the State's officers directly. The Federal Government may neither issue directives requiring the States to address particular problems, nor command the States' officers, or those of their political subdivisions, to administer or enforce a federal regulatory program. It matters not whether policy making is involved, and no case by case weighing of the burdens or benefits is necessary; such commands are fundamentally incompatible with our constitutional system of dual sovereignty.

unknown

Source: U.S. Supreme Court, 1997, Printz v. United States

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on citizenship, congress, constitution, design, government, innovation, politics, and power

It is incontestable that the Constitution established a system of "dual sovereignty.". . . Although the States surrendered many of their powers to the new Federal Government, they retained a residuary and inviolable sovereignty. . . . The Framers explicitly chose a Constitution that confers upon Congress the power to regulate individuals, not States. The great innovation of this design was that our citizens would have two political capacities, one state and one federal, each protected from incursion by the other.

unknown

Source: U.S. Supreme Court, 1997, Printz v. United States [Interior quotes & citations omitted]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on absence, argument, assumptions, congress, government, history, laws, power, and service

The Government contends . . . that the earliest Congresses enacted statutes that required the participation of state officials in the implementation of federal laws . . . we do not think the early statues imposing obligations on state courts imply a power of Congress to impress the state executive into its service. Indeed, it can be argued that the numerousness of these statutes, contrasted with the utter lack of statutes imposing obligations on the States' executive (notwithstanding the attractiveness of that course to Congress), suggests an assumed absence of such power. . . . To complete the historical record, we must note that there is not only an absence of executive commandeering statutes in the early Congress, but there is an absence of them in our later history as well, at least until very recent years.

unknown

Source: U.S. Supreme Court, 1997, Printz v. United States

Contributed by: Zaady

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