conflict

A Quote by William Wordsworth on conflict and laws

And through the heat of conflict keeps the law In calmness made, and sees what he foresaw.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Character of the Happy Warrior.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William H. Seward on conflict and force

It is an irrepressible conflict between opposing and enduring forces.

William H. Seward (1801 - 1872)

Source: Speech, Oct. 25, 1858.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Ellery Channing on conflict, difficulty, and spirit

Difficulties are meant to rouse, not discourage. The human spirit is to grow strong by conflict.

William Ellery Channing (1780 - 1842)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wendell Phillips on change, christ, christianity, conflict, creation, earth, god, history, science, scientists, and truth

The paleontological evidence before us today clearly demonstrates ordered progressive change with the successive development of new faunal and floral assemblages through the changing epochs of our earth's history. There should be no real conflict between science, which is the search for truth, and Christ's teachings, which I hold to be truth itself. It is only when scientists remove God from creation that the Christian is faced with an irreconcilable situation.

Wendell Phillips (1811 - 1884)

Source: Sheba's Buried City

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Savage Landor on clarity, conflict, guidance, heart, improvement, judgment, and understanding

Heat and animosity, contest and conflict may sharpen the wits, although they rarely do; they never strengthen the understanding, clear the perspicacity, guide the judgment, or improve the heart.

Walter Savage Landor (1775 - 1864)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Umberto Eco on conflict, consequences, day, justice, nations, paradise, population, religion, and terrorism

Terrorism [is] a biological consequence of the multinationals, just as a day of fever is the reasonable price of an effective vaccine . . . The conflict is between great powers, not between demons and heroes. Unhappily, therefore, is the nation that finds the "heroes" underfoot, especially if they still think in religious terms and involve the population in their bloody ascent to an uninhabited paradise.

Umberto Eco (1932 -)

Source: "Striking at the Heart of the State" (1978) from Travels in Hyperreality

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Timothy Bentley on attitude, conflict, and relationships

Whenever you're in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is attitude.

Timothy Bentley

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Paine on conflict

The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.

Thomas Paine (1737 - 1809)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Paine on army, conflict, country, crisis, earth, freedom, god, heaven, hell, love, men, patriotism, power, service, slavery, soldiers, soul, tyranny, value, and women

These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we may obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: 't is dearness only that gives everything its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods. It would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as Freedom should not be highly rated. Britain, with an army to enforce her tyranny, has declared that she has a right (not only to tax) but "to bind us in all cases whatsoever," and if being bound in that manner, is not slavery, then is there not such a thing as slavery upon earth. Even the expression is impious, for so unlimited a power can belong only to God.

Thomas Paine (1737 - 1809)

Source: The American Crisis, no. 1, December 23, 1776

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content