concern

A Quote by Albert Einstein on blessings, concern, fate, interest, labor, mankind, mind, order, problems, science, understanding, and work

It is not enough that you should understand about applied science in order that your work may increase man's blessings. Concern for the man himself and his fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavors; concern for the great unsolved problems of the organization of labor and the distribution of goods in order that the creations of our mind shall be a blessing and not a curse to mankind. Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: speech, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Feb.16,1931, in The NY Times, February 17, 1931, p. 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Einstein on authority, belief, concern, ethics, immortality, and individuality

I do not believe in the immortality of the individual, and I consider ethics to be an exclusively human concern without any superhuman authority behind it.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Einstein on concern, destiny, effort, and interest

The concern for man and his destiny must always be the chief interest of all technical effort. Never forget it among your diagrams and equations.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Camus on concern and happiness

To be happy, we must not be too concerned with others.

Albert Camus (1913 - 1960)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on character, concern, consequences, facts, logic, philosophy, questions, and words

In other words, the propositions of philosophy are not factual, but linguistic in character - that is, they do not describe the behaviour of physical, or even mental, objects; they express definitions, or the formal consequences of definitions. Accordingly we may say that philosophy is a department of logic. For we will see that the characteristic mark of a purely logical enquiry, is that it is concerned with the formal consequences of our definitions and not with questions of empirical fact.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch. 2, p.76

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Agatha Christie on concern, money, and trust

Where large sums of money are concerned, it is advisable to trust nobody.

Agatha Christie (1891 - 1976)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on concern

in

I don't know who my grandfather was; I'm much more concerned to know what his grandson will be.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on concern, contentment, and failure

My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with your failure.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on concern and god

Sir, my concern is not whether God is on our side, My great concern is to be on God's side, for God is always right.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on body, colors, concern, divinity, earth, god, heart, imagination, names, perception, reality, sacred, secrets, senses, spirit, spirituality, truth, understanding, and world

Turn your face toward the sacred Mosque (Koran 2:144,149,150) Commentary: This means: "Turn the [divine] face which is particular to you. . . ." This face is the secret (sirr) through which your spirit subsists. . . . It is the source of man's being and the command [formulated in the verse] is in reality concerned with this. God . . . does not consider your exterior form but only your heart - which is the "divine face" proper to each of you, and it is this "divine face" which, in you, "contains" God even though His sky and His earth cannot contain Him. . . . He who turns (toward the sacred Mosque} with his body alone, without also turning this face, has not truly turned. . . . He who looks with his finite eye only sees finite things - bodies, colors or surfaces. He who looks with the eye of his hidden spirit sees the hidden things - spiritual beings, forms of the world of the absolute Imagination, jinns - all of which are still only created beings and therefore veils. But he who looks with his face, that is to say, his secret (sirr), sees the face which God has in each thing; for, in truth, only Allah sees Allah, only Allah knows Allah. . . . As for the "sacred Mosque" . . . , although this term applies literally to the Mosque perceived by the senses, it should be understood as designating the degree which totalizes all the divine Names, that is to say the degree of the divinity which is the "place of the prostration" - of the prostration of the heart, not of the body.

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 149, pp. 105-107

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content