computers

A Quote by unknown on computers and jobs

Computers will not be perfected until they can compute how much more than the estimate the job will cost.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on computers

Don't anthropomorphize computers. They don't like it.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on computers and future

Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons.

unknown

Source: Popular Science, forecasting the relentless march of science, 1949

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on computers, good, people, reason, and work

One good reason why computers can do more work than people is that they never have to stop and answer the phone.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on computers and stupidity

Computers are stupid - they do exactly what you tell them to do.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on computers

To err is human and to blame it on a computer is even more so.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Merle Meacham on computers, men, and mistake

In a few minutes a computer can make a mistake so great that it would take many men many months to equal it.

Merle Meacham

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas J. Watson on computers, science, society, and world

I think there's a world market for about five computers. Quoted by Charles Hard Townes In Martin Moskovits (Ed.), Science and Society, the John C. Polanyi Nobel Lareates Lectures, Anansi Press, Concord, Ontario, 1995, p 8.

Thomas Watson (1874 - 1956)

Source: 1943 (see below)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Terence Kealey on america, computers, country, decisions, economics, electricity, future, generations, government, growth, losing, money, myth, power, projects, research, science, service, success, war, wealth, and world

There is a central myth about British science and economic growth, and it goes like this: science breeds wealth, Britain is in economic decline, therefore Britain has not done enough science. Actually, it is easy to show that a key cause of Britain's economic decline has been that the government has funded too much science. . . . Post-war British science policy illustrates the folly of wasting money on research. The government decided, as it surveyed the ruins of war-torn Europe in 1945, that the future lay in computers, nuclear power and jet aircraft, so successive administrations poured money into these projects-to vast technical success. The world's first commercial mainframe computer was British, sold by Ferrranti in 1951; the world's first commercial jet aircraft was British, the Comet, in service in 1952; the first nuclear power station was British, Calder Hall, commissioned in 1956; and the world's first and only supersonic commercial jet aircraft was Anglo-French, Concorde, in service in 1976. Yet these technical advances crippled us economically, because they were so uncommercial. The nuclear generation of electricity, for example, had lost 2.1 billion pounds by 1975 (2.1 billion pounds was a lot then); Concord had lost us, alone, 2.3 billion pounds by 1976; the Comet crashed and America now dominates computers. Had these vast sums of money not been wasted on research, we would now be a significantly richer country.

Terence Kealey

Source: Terence Kealey Wasting Billions, the Scientific Way, The Sunday Times, Oct. 13, 1996.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney J. Harris on computers, danger, and men

The real danger is not that computers will begin to think like men, but that men will begin to think like computers.

Sydney J. Harris (1917 - 1986)

Source: H. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt, 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

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