composers

A Quote by Igor Stravinsky on assumptions, composers, knowledge, learning, life, mistakes, and wisdom

I have learned throughout my life as a composer chiefly through my mistakes and pursuits of false assumptions, not by my exposure to founts of wisdom and knowledge.

Igor Stravinsky (1882 - 1971)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Purcell on composers, genius, language, music, singers, skill, and songs

Composer, organist, bass and countertenor singer. He was one of the greatest composers of the baroque period and one of the greatest of all English composers. Rreference to Purcell by James II's Attorney-General, Roger North, succintly sums up his stature: 'the Orpheus Britannicus . . . a greater musical genius England never had'. He excelled in every branch of music to which he turned his hand. Purcell showed exceptional skill in the flexible setting of the English language, and some of his solo song-scenas (like Mad Bess and The Blessed Virgin's Expostulation) are remarkable example of dramatised declamation.

Henry Purcell (1659 - 1695)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Harold B. Lee on birth, body, composers, earth, god, heaven, individuality, mortality, parenthood, preparation, spirit, spirituality, words, and world

The spirit, if it could be seen with mortal eyes, would appear in bodily shape like a full-grown person with individual endowments that make it a counter-part of the body in which it [resides,] "that which is temporal in the likeness of that which is spiritual." (D&C 77:2.) It was that which came from God and entered at birth into the infant body prepared by its mortal parents. The spirit was of the "Lord from heaven." The physical body was "of the earth, earthy," (2 Cor. 15:47) or in other words, composed of the elements of which the things in the physical world are composed.

Harold B. Lee (1899 - 1973)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gervase Hughes on composers and words

It has been said that if the opening phrase of a classical menuet can be fitted to the words "Are you the O'Reilly who owns this hotel?" then it was composed by Haydn; if they can't then it wasn't.

Gervase Hughes (1905 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Giacomo Puccini on ability, composers, emotion, heart, heroism, history, kindness, life, musicians, opera, pain, passion, poetry, poets, popularity, power, reason, sensuality, style, tenderness, understanding, women, and writing

Puccini's personal life was an interesting one. He was exceedingly fond of hunting, smoking, attractive woman, mechanical devices of any kind, and acquiring houses. He died in 1924 from a heart attack while undergoing treatment for throat cancer. He was 65 years old. A national state of mourning was declared in Italy. Despite torrential rain, mourners lined the streets of Milan in tribute to the composer of some of the most popular works in the history of opera. Puccini chose to write about the everyday rather than the heroic. He understood the little things of life and portrayed them with sensitivity. Another reason for his popularity was his ability to write glowing melodies --- intimate, tender, passionate melodies. He understood the power of melody to express the deepest emotions, and his orchestral writing was eloquent. He was not only a highly skillful musician, but a poet who understood the significance of the smallest details, and a dramatist who possessed an innate sense of pacing and timing. While he was in the process of composing La Boheme, he wrote that his style was "poetry and again poetry - tenderness mixed with pain; sensuality; a drama surprising and burning; and a rocketing finale."

Giacomo Puccini (1858 - 1924)

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A Quote by Gervase Hughes on composers and words

It has been said that if the opening phrase of a classical menuet can be fitted to the words "Are you the O'Reilly who owns this hotel?" then it was composed by Haydn; if they can't then it wasn't.

Gervase Hughes (1905 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Santayana on composers, problems, purity, senses, songs, and surprises

It is a pleasant surprise to him (the pure mathematician) and an added problem if he finds that the arts can use his calculations, or that the senses can verify them, much as if a composer found that sailors could heave better when singing his songs.

George Santayana (1863 - 1952)

Source: J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Linley on art, authority, authors, composers, existence, happiness, heart, hope, life, losing, memory, music, newspapers, past, privacy, purity, songs, time, tranquility, and wishes

Tho' lost to sight, to mem'ry dear Thou ever wilt remain; One only hope my heart can cheer,- The hope to meet again. Oh fondly on the past I dwell, And oft recall those hours When, wand'ring down the shady dell, We gathered the wild-flowers. Yes, life then seem'd one pure delight, Tho' now each spot looks drear; Yet tho' thy smile be lost to sight, To mem'ry thou art dear. Oft in the tranquil hour of night, When stars illume the sky, I gaze upon each orb of light, And wish that thou wert by. I think upon that happy time, That time so fondly lov'd, When last we heard the sweet bells chime, As thro' the fields we rov'd. Yes, life then seem'd one pure delight, Tho' now each spot looks drear; Yet tho' thy smile be lost to sight, To mem'ry thou art dear. This song-written and composed by Linley for Mr. Augustus Braham, and sung by him-is given entirely, as so much inquiry has been made for the source of "Though lost to Sight, to Memory dear." It is not known when the song was written,-probably about 1830. Another song, entitled "Though lost to Sight, to Memory dear," was published in London in 1880, purporting to have been "written by Ruthven Jenkyns in 1703." It is said to have been published in the "Magazine for Mariners." No such magazine, however, ever existed, and the composer of the music acknowledged, in a private letter, to have copied the song from an American newspaper. There is no other authority for the origin of this song, and the reputed author, Ruthven Jenkyns, was living, under the name of C--, in California in 1882.

George Linley (1798 - 1865)

Source: Song. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Boas on body, citizenship, college, composers, good, and health

A college should feel alarmed rather than pleased if it graduates nothing but good citizens. For when the body politic is composed of nothing but submissive individuals, half of its health and all of its vigor have disappeared.

George Boas

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Geoffrey B. Charlesworth on clarity and composers

Spring makes its own statement, so loud and clear that the gardener seems to be only one of the instruments, not the composer.

Geoffrey B. Charlesworth

Contributed by: Zaady

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