complaints

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on complaints

Constant complaint is the poorest sort of pay for all the comforts we enjoy.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ben Jonson on age, complaints, death, disappointment, envy, force, hope, paradox, posterity, reason, present, time, and truth

That praises are without reason lavished on the dead, and that the honours due only to are paid to antiquity, is a complaint likely to be always continued by those who, being able to add nothing to truth, hope for eminence from the heresies of paradox; or those who, being forced by disappointment upon consolatory expedients, are willing to hope from posterity what the present age refuses, and flatter themselves that the regard which is yet denied by envy will be at last bestowed by time.

Ben Jonson

Source: Jonson, Preface to Shakespeare

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on action, affection, complaints, defense, desires, expectation, facts, hatred, hope, indifference, insanity, justice, love, reason, struggle, suspicion, thought, understanding, wealth, wishes, and words

What did they seek from him? What were they after? He had never asked anything of them; it was they who wished to hold him, they who pressed a claim on him - and they seemed to have the form of affection, but it was a form which he found harder to endure than any sort of hatred. He despised causeless affection, just as he despised unearned wealth. They professed to love him for some unknown reason and they ignored all the things for which he could wish to be loved. He wondered what response they could hope to obtain from him in such manner - if his response was what they wanted. And it was, he thought; else why those constant complaints, those unceasing accusations about his indifference? Why that chronic air of suspicion, as if they were waiting to be hurt? He had never had a desire to hurt them, but he had always felt their defensive, reproachful expectation; they seemed wounded by anything he said, it was not a matter of his words or actions, it was almost . . . almost as if they were wounded by the mere fact of his being. Don't start imagining the insane - he told himself severely, struggling to face the riddle with the strictest of his ruthless sense of justice. He could not condemn them without understanding; and he could not understand.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 42-3)

Contributed by: Zaady

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