companions

A Quote by John Taylor on brothers, children, companions, friendship, god, good, husbands, kindness, relatives, sister, and wives

It is true, we do not like to lose a good, kind companion, a wife, a husband, a child, a brother, a sister, or any of our near and dear friends or relatives; but we have to do it, and it is right and proper that we should. They go a little before us; when we get there they will receive and welcome us and say, "God bless you, you have come at last." That is the way I look at it. I ex pect to strike hands and embrace my friends who have gone before.

John Taylor (1808 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Lyly on companions and misery

In misery it is great comfort to have a companion.

John Lyly (1554 - 1606)

Source: Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1579)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Logan on birds, certainty, clarity, companions, guests, guidance, heaven, imitation, music, songs, sorrow, time, and path

HAIL, beauteous stranger of the grove! Thou messenger of Spring! Now Heaven repairs thy rural seat, And woods thy welcome ring. What time the daisy decks the green, Thy certain voice we hear: Hast thou a star to guide thy path, Or mark the rolling year? Delightful visitant! with thee I hail the time of flowers, And hear the sound of music sweet From birds among the bowers. The schoolboy, wand'ring through the wood To pull the primrose gay, Starts, the new voice of Spring to hear And imitates thy lay. What time the pea puts on the bloom, Thou fli'st thy vocal vale, An annual guest in other lands, Another Spring to hail. Sweet bird! thy bower is ever green, Thy sky is ever clear; Thou hast no sorrow in thy song, No Winter in thy year! O could I fly, I'd fly with thee! We'd make, with joyful wing, Our annual visit o'er the globe, Companions of the Spring

John Logan (1748 - 1788)

Source: To the Cuckoo

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Isocrates on change, companions, and friendship

Make no man your friend before inquiring how he has used his former friends; for you must expect him to treat you as he has treated them. Be slow to give your friendship, but when you have given it, strive to make it lasting; for it is as reprehensible to make many changes in one's associates as to have no friends at all. Neither test your friends to your own injury nor be willing to forego a test of your companions.

Isocrates (436 - 338 BC)

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A Quote by Isaac Barrow on books, cheerfulness, companions, faith, and friendship

He that loveth a book will never want for a faithful friend, a wholesome counselor, a cheerful companion, an effectual comforter.

Isaac Barrow (1630 - 1677)

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A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on companions, knowledge, love, and power

The personal Lord speaks only in symbols; his eloquence is all in enigmas. And at a mysterious sign of recognition the visionary is overwhelmed by such a power of love that he loses consciousness. When he comes to himself, his Companion reveals to him: "I am knowledge, I am he who knows and I am what is known."

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 279

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hubert H. Humphrey, Jr. on companions, concern, socialism, and weakness

Companion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism.

Hubert H. Humphrey (1911 - 1978)

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A Quote by Quintus Horatius Flaccus Horace on companions, guilt, and punishment

Punishment closely follows guilt as its companion. -Culpam poena premit comes

Horatius (65 - 8 BC)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on companions and men

The height of great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

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A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on companions, deed, men, saints, shame, and vices

Saint Augustine! well has thou said, That of our vices we can frame A ladder, if we will but tread Beneath our feet each deed of shame! . . . The heights by great men reached and kept Were not attained by sudden flight, But they, while their companions slept, Were toiling upward in the night.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Source: The Ladder of Saint Augustine

Contributed by: Zaady

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