civilization

A Quote by Marion G. Romney on civilization, direction, god, hope, learning, people, power, science, spirituality, survival, thought, and war

Many people correctly make the point that our only hope is to turn to God. For example, Charles Lindbergh, who said that in his young manhood he thought "science was more important than either man or God," and that "without a highly developed science modern man lacks the power to survive," . . . went to Germany after the war to see what Allied bombing had done to the Germans, who had been leaders in science. There, he says, "I learned that if his civilization is to continue, modern man must direct the material power of his science by the spiritual truths of his God."

Marion G. Romney (1897 - 1988)

Source: at BYU, February 11, 1964

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Margaret Mitchell on civilization, justice, money, and people

What most people don't seem to realize is that there is just as much money to be made out of the wreckage of a civilization as from the upbuilding of one.

Margaret Mitchell (1900 - 1949)

Source: Rhett Butler, in Gone with the Wind, vol. 1, pt. 2, ch. 9, 1936.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chief Luther Standing Bear on civilization, generosity, honesty, love, and truth

Civilization has been thrust upon me... and it has not added one whit to my love for truth, honesty, and generosity.

Luther Standing Bear

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein on civilization, clarity, and progress

Our civilization is characterized by the word "progress." Progress is its form rather than making progress being one of its features. Typically it constructs. It is occupied with building an ever more complicated structure. And even clarity is seldom sought.

Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889 - 1951)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Louis L'Amour on books, civilization, history, people, and women

Books are the building blocks of civilization and a people without books are a people without history, a people with no story older than the tales of the oldest man or woman.

Louis L'Amour (1908 - 1988)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lincoln Steffens on art and civilization

Art is like a border of flowers along the course of civilization.

Lincoln Steffens

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lesslie Newbigin on acquaintance, agreement, christ, christianity, church, cities, civilization, community, control, culture, earth, family, force, god, home, individuality, jesus, jobs, loneliness, machines, men, nations, nature, neighbors, p

Western European civilization has witnessed a sort of atomizing process, in which the individual is more and more set free from his natural setting in family and neighborhood, and becomes a sort of replaceable unit in the social machine. His nearest neighbors may not even know his name. He is free to move from place to place, from job to job, from acquaintance to acquaintance, and - if he has attained a high degree of emancipation - from wife to wife. He is in every context a more and more anonymous and replaceable part, the perfect incarnation of the rationalist conception of man. Wherever western civilization has spread in the past one hundred years, it has carried this atomizing process with it. Its characteristic product in Calcutta, Shanghai, or Johannesburg, is the modern city into which myriads of human beings, loosened from their old ties in village or tribe or caste, like grains of sand fretted by water from an ancient block of sandstone, are ceaselessly churned around in the whirlpool of the city - anonymous, identical, replaceable units. In such a situation, it is natural that men should long for some sort of real community, for men cannot be human without it. It is especially natural that Christians should reach out after that part of Christian doctrine which speaks of the true, God-given community, the Church of Jesus Christ. We have witnessed the appalling results of trying to go back to some sort of primitive collectivity based on the total control of the individual, down t o the depths of his spirit, by an all-powerful group. Yet we know that we cannot condemn this solution to the problem of man's loneliness if we have no other to offer. It is natural that men should ask with a greater eagerness than ever before, such questions as these: "Is there in truth a family of God on earth to which I can belong, a place where all men can be truly at home? If so, where is it to be found, what are its marks, and how is it related to, and distinguished from, the known communities of family, nation, and culture? What are its boundaries, its structure, its terms of membership? And how comes it that those who claim to be the spokesmen of that one holy fellowship are themselves at war with one another as to the fundamentals of its nature, and unable to agree to live together in unity and concord?" The breakdown of Christendom has forced such questions as these to the front. I think that there is no more urgent theological task than to try to give them plain and credible answers.

Lesslie Newbigin

Source: The Household of God

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lemuel K. Washburn on civilization, credulity, enemies, history, ignorance, and tyranny

History shows that there is nothing so easy to enslave and nothing so hard to emancipate as ignorance, hence it becomes the double enemy of civilization. By its servility it is the prey of tyranny, and by its credulity it is the foe of enlightenment

Lemuel K. Washburn

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lawrence Gould on belief, civilization, death, force, future, guidance, nobility, spirituality, and wishes

I do not believe the greatest threat to our future is from bombs or guided missiles. I don't think our civilization will die that way. I think it will die when we no longer care when the spiritual forces that make us wish to be right and noble die in our hearts.

Lawrence Gould

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on civilization, life, motives, purpose, spirituality, and tragedy

Spiritual awakening is the most essential thing in man's life, and it is the sole purpose of being. Is not civilization, in all its tragic forms, a supreme motive for spiritual awakening?

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: Wisdom of Gibran

Contributed by: Zaady

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