civilization

A Quote by Sigmund Freud on religion, civilization, and meaning

If one wishes to form a true estimate of the full grandeur of religion, one must keep in mind what it undertakes to do for men. It gives them information about the source and origin of the universe, it assures them of protection and final happiness amid the changing vicissitudes of life, and it guides their thoughts and motions by means of precepts which are backed by the whole force of its authority.

Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939)

Source: A Philosophy Of Life (lecture)

Contributed by: `

A Quote by Sigmund Freud on religion, desire, civilization, ethics, progress, reason, and superego

Our knowledge of the historical worth of certain religious doctrines increases our respect for them, but does not invalidate our proposal that they should cease to be put forward as the reasons for the precepts of civilization. On the contrary! Those historical residues have helped us to view religious teachings, as it were, as neurotic relics, and we may now argue that the time has probably come, as it does in an analytic treatment, for replacing the effects of repression by the results of the rational operation of the intellect.

Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939)

Source: The Future of an Illusion.

Contributed by: `

A Quote by Sigmund Freud on revolution, civilization, dissatisfaction, and collapse

A civilization which leaves so large a number of its participants unsatisfied and drives them into revolt neither has nor deserves the prospect of a lasting existence.

Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939)

Source: The Future of an Illusion

Contributed by: `

A Quote by Sigmund Freud on revolution, civilization, dissatisfaction, and collapse

A civilization which leaves so large a number of its participants unsatisfied and drives them into revolt neither has nor deserves the prospect of a lasting existence.

Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939)

Source: The Future of an Illusion

Contributed by: `

A Quote by Jonathan Patzer on earth, body, mankind, mind, thrive, and civilization

The Earth is like our body, and mankind is our mind; we can't take care of only one if we want to thrive as a civilization.

Jonathan Patzer

Contributed by: JD

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, rights, democratism, principles, delusion, morals, politics, values, duties, obligations, civilization, and society

The moral and the political are twisted together in all this like a torqued Moebius-strip: we define our political duties toward others or our rights of expectation from them in terms of the highest moral values and obligations and principles conceivable to us. But these highest moral values etc. are themselves ideologically stunted things, a bonsai-ethos that has been deformed by the contraceptive culture of the democratist Many. Do human beings have a positive and universally recognizable right to be left alone as ingrown idiotes, as self-gratifying swinish consumers, as pathetic sacks of illusions and delusions? Are ultimate rights something that the least cultured and least reflective are fit to define for themselves, much less for everyone in general? Can any civilization afford to leave its most vital principles to be framed and legislated by the least philosophically aware? When a society organizes the entire thrust of its energies and institutions to mass-produce such obtuse types, and when malleable human nature makes this organized stupefaction all too easy and efficient, how can any mere exceptional individuals do anything about such a Malthusian dynamic?

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, society, human development, human nature, and civilization

Human life is an extension of the principles of nature, and human civilization is a venture extrapolated out of human natures: man and his natural potential are the root of the entire human domain. The great task of all philosophizing is to become competent to interpret and steer the potential developmental forces in human natures and in the human condition, both of which are prodigiously fatalistic.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on violence, governmen, society, civilization, liberty, freedom, socialism, and collectivism

It is a double-edged makeshift to entrust an individual or a group of individuals with the authority to resort to violence. The enticement implied is too tempting for a human being. The men who are to protect the community against violent aggression easily turn into the most dangerous aggressors. They transgress their mandate. They misuse their power for the oppression of those whom they were expected to defend against oppression. The main political problem is how to prevent the police power from becoming tyrannical. This is the meaning of all the struggles for liberty. The essential characteristic of Western civilization that distinguishes it from the arrested and petrified civilizations of the East was and is its concern for freedom from the state. The history of the West, from the age of the Greek πόλις [city-state] down to the present-day resistance to socialism, is essentially the history of the fight for liberty against the encroachments of the officeholders.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Mises, Ludwig Von (1962). The Ultimate foundation of Economic Science (2nd ed.). Foundation of Economic Education: Irvington-on-Hudson, NY. p. 99-100

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on god, society, civilization, choice, and discovery

Call it the fault of civilization.God isn't compatible with macinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness. You must make your choice. Our civilizaition has chosen machinery and medicine and happiness. That's why I have to keep these books locked up in the safe. They're smut. People would be shocked if...

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Brave New World, Pages: 234

Contributed by: Aaron

A Quote by Mark Skousen on society, civilization, taxation, failure, totalitarian state, success, and voluntary society

Taxation is the price we pay for failing to build a civilized society. The higher the tax level, the greater the failure. A centrally planned totalitarian state represents a complete defeat for the civilized world, while a totally voluntary society represents its ultimate success.

Mark Skousen

Source: http://www.mskousen.com/Books/PvF/pvftext.html

Contributed by: peter

Syndicate content