citizenship

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on citizenship, country, difficulty, earth, freedom, generations, giving, history, honor, hope, past, power, quiet, responsibility, slavery, present, and world

The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country. Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down in honor or dishonor to the latest generation. We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free - honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope of earth.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Address to the Congress of the United States, Dec. 1, 1862

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on ability, belief, citizenship, country, departure, gold, ideas, interest, life, mountains, nations, prosperity, war, wealth, and world

I have very large ideas of the mineral wealth of our Nation. I believe it practically inexhaustible. It abounds all over the western country, from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific, and its development has scarcely commenced. . . . Immigration, which even the war has not stopped, will land upon our shores hundred of thousands more per year from overcrowded Europe. I intend to point them to the gold and silver that waits for them in the West. Toll the miners from me, that I shall promote their interests to the utmost of my ability; because their prosperity is the prosperity of the Nation, and we shall prove in a very few years that we are indeed the treasury of the world. Message for the miners of the West, delivered verbally to Speaker of the House Schuyler Colfax, who was about to depart on a trip to the West, in the afternoon of April 14, 1865, before Lincoln left for Ford's Theatre. Colfax delivered the message to a large crowd of citizens in Denver, Colorado, May 27, 1865. -Edward Winslow Martin, The Life and Public Services of Schuyler Colfax, pp. 187-88 (1868).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: message for the miners of the West (SEE BELOW)

Contributed by: Zaady

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