citizenship

A Quote by William Shakespeare on change, citizenship, distrust, divinity, fear, god, instinct, men, proof, reason, and soul

FIRST CITIZEN: Come, come, we fear the worst; all shall be well. THIRD CITIZEN: When clouds appear, wise men put on their cloaks; When great leaves fall, the winter is at hand; When the sun sets, who doth not look for night? Untimely storms make men expect a dearth. All my be well; but if God sort it so. 'Tis more than we deserve, or I expect. SECOND CITIZEN: Truly, the souls of men are full of dread; Ye cannot reason almost with a man That looks not heavily and full of fear. THIRD CITIZEN: Before the times of change, still is it so: By a divine instinct men's minds distrust Ensuing dangers; as, by proof, we see The waters swell before a boisterous storm.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act 1I, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on citizenship, friendship, love, and privacy

Why, friends, you go to do you know not what: Wherein hath Caesar thus deserved your loves? Alas, you know not: I must tell you then: You have forgot the will I told you of. . . . . Here is the will, and under Caesar's seal. To every Roman citizen he gives, To every several man, seventy-five drachmas. . . . . Moreover, he hath left you all his walks, His private arbours and new-planted orchards, On this side Tiber; he hath left them you, And to your heirs for ever, common pleasures, To walk abroad, and recreate yourselves. Here was a Caesar! when comes such another?

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Orville Douglas on citizenship, exercise, and laws

When a legislature undertakes to proscribe the exercise of a citizen's constitutional rights it acts lawlessly and the citizen can take matters into his own hands and proceed on the basis that such a law is no law at all.

William Orville Douglas (1898 - 1980)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Jennings Bryan on citizenship and errors

The humblest citizen of all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error.

William Jennings Bryan (1860 - 1925)

Source: Speech, National Democratic Convention, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wheeler McMillen on animals, belief, blessings, children, cities, citizenship, communism, dance, earth, freedom, god, good, honor, labor, laws, liberty, magic, managers, men, men and women, miracles, nature, neighbors, peace, people, rules, sc

We are American farmers. We are Americans. We are farmers. Our grandsires freed this virgin continent,plowed it from East to West, and gave it to us.This land is for us and for our children tomake richer and more fruitful. We grow foods, fibers - fifteen times asmuch as we use. We grow men and women -- farmers, Presidents, and Senators, generals of industry,captains of commerce, missionaries, builders. Communists would call us capitalists, because we own land and we own tools. Capitalists might choose to call us laborers,because we work with our hands. Others may call us managers, because wedirect men and manage materials. Our children call us "Dad." We are also deacons, stockholders, mechanics, veterinarians, electricians, schoolboard members, Rotarians, voters, scientists,neighbors, men of good will. Our rules are Nature's rules, the laws of God. We command the magic of the seasons andthe miracles of science, because we obey Nature's rules. Our raw materials are soil and seed, animals, the atmosphere and the rain, and the mighty sun. We work with brains. We toil with musclesof steel, fed by the fires of lightning and byoils from the inner earth. We are partners with the laboratory, withthe factory, and with all the people. We provide industry with ever-renewableraw materials from the inexhaustible world ofplants. We buy products from the labor ofevery fellow-citizen.Our efficiencies have raised great cities andhappy towns, and have given all the peoplemeat and bread. We believe in work and in honor We believe in freedom. We are grateful for the American freedomthat has let us earn so many blessings. We know that liberty is our most preciouspossession. At the ballot-boxes and on thebattlefield we shall defend it. We have proven a new pattern of abun-dance. We pray that we may also help tomake a pattern for peace.

Wheeler McMillen

Source: American Farmers

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on art, citizenship, government, and money

In general, the art of government consists of taking as much money as possible from one class of citizens to give to another.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Source: Dictionnaire Philosophique, 1764

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Victoria Claflin Woodhull on citizenship, nations, and politics

The American nation, in its march onward and upward, can not publicly choke the intellectual and political activity of half its citizens by narrow statutes.

Victoria Claflin Woodhull (1838 - 1927)

Source: As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch.23,by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, 1882.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Victoria Claflin Woodhull on citizenship, colors, government, people, and sex

The will of the entire people is the true basis of republican government, and a free expression . . . by the public vote of all citizens, without distinctions of race, color, occupation, or sex, is the only means by which that will can be ascertained.

Victoria Claflin Woodhull (1838 - 1927)

Source: As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch.23,by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, 1882.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on citizenship, fear, freedom, government, and tyranny

When citizens fear government, we call it tyranny When government fears citizens, we call it freedom

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on citizenship, congress, constitution, design, government, innovation, politics, and power

It is incontestable that the Constitution established a system of "dual sovereignty.". . . Although the States surrendered many of their powers to the new Federal Government, they retained a residuary and inviolable sovereignty. . . . The Framers explicitly chose a Constitution that confers upon Congress the power to regulate individuals, not States. The great innovation of this design was that our citizens would have two political capacities, one state and one federal, each protected from incursion by the other.

unknown

Source: U.S. Supreme Court, 1997, Printz v. United States [Interior quotes & citations omitted]

Contributed by: Zaady

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