cities

A Quote by W. H. Hudson on church, cities, joy, nature, religion, shame, and soul

For here the religion that languishes in crowded cities or steals shame-faced to hide itself in dim churches, flourishes greatly, filling the soul with a solemn joy. Face to face with Nature on the vast hills at eventide, who does not feel himself near to the Unseen?

W. H. Hudson (1841 - 1922)

Source: The Purple Land

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Velma West Sykes on adventure, christmas, cities, day, friendship, sleep, stability, travel, and work

Christmas parable: The stable boy had finished work that day, Had filled the manger with new, fragrant hay, Had fed the beasts, and usually would sleep Snuggled for warmth among the placid sheep; But not tonight, for he'd conceived a plan To join a merchant's camel caravan And travel to far places. He had heard Exciting tales of cities which had stirred His longing for adventure. He would go Where things were happening; his friends would know Why he had gone. He often said to them, "Oh, nothing happens here in bethlehem." He looked back once, before they traveled far, And wondered vaguely: why that brilliant star?

Velma West Sykes

Source: Magazine clipping. Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cities and newspapers

A small town newspaper reported that a newcomer, who had moved there to escape the traffic and congestion of the city, was run over by the Welcome Wagon.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cities, country, and reform

It is always easy to reform the city if you live in the country.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cities, god, justice, mind, and tyranny

The morning sun rises to greet him, and in its low, warm light he stands like some sort of pagan god, or deposed tyrant, staring out over the city he's sworn to... stare out over. And it's evident, just by looking at him that he's got some pretty heavy things on his mind.

unknown

Source: The Tick

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cities

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In Dublin's fair city, where girls are so pretty, I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone, As she wheeled her wheelbarrow through streets broad and narrow, Crying, Cockles and mussels! alive, alive, oh!

unknown

Source: Cockles and Mussels, Oxford Song Book

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on boldness, cities, innocence, love, and pity

Ah, some love Paris, And some Purdue. But love is an archer with a low I.Q. A bold, bad bowman, and innocent of pity. So I'm in love with New York City.

unknown

Source: A Kind of Love Letter to New York, 1954

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cities, day, maturity, and plants

A well maintained landscape with mature trees can increase property values up to 25 percent. Trees can cool houses in the summer. A city lot with 30 percent plant cover provides the equivalent cooling necessary to air condition two moderately sized houses 12 hours a day in the summer.

unknown

Source: The Value of Trees Around Your Home.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cities, happiness, and mind

The city of happiness is in the state of mind.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on birth, bitterness, cities, darkness, dawn, death, doubt, emptiness, horses, information, journeys, justice, lies, men, people, regret, sleep, thought, time, travel, water, weather, wine, and women

Journey of the Magi "A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For a journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter." And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation, With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, And three trees on the low sky. And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins. But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

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