church

A Quote by Samuel Smith Drury on church and country

We are building may splendid churches in this country, but we are not providing leaders to run them. I would rather have a wooden church with a splendid parson, than a splendid church with a wooden parson.

Samuel Smith Drury

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on church, danger, faith, hope, influence, mind, religion, reward, and worship

To be of no church is dangerous. Religion, of which the rewards are distant, and which is animated only by faith and hope, will glide by degrees out of the mind unless it be invigorated and reimpressed by external ordinances, by stated calls to worship, and the salutary influence of example.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Life of the Poets. Milton.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Clement of Alexandria on acceptance, age, beginning, belief, brothers, certainty, character, christ, church, cities, companions, cooperation, corruption, crime, death, departure, divinity, elderly, evil, familiarity, fatherhood, fear, fo

An apocryphal story from the writings of Clement of Alexandria regarding John the Apostle quoted by John H. Vandenberg, Conference Report, October 1963, p.45 - p.46: ". . . about John the Apostle, handed down and preserved in memory. When, on the death of the tyrant, he (John) passed over to Ephesus from the Island of Patmos, he used to make missionary journeys also to neighboring gentile cities, in some places to appoint bishops, and in some to set in order whole churches and . . . to appoint one of those indicated by the Spirit. On his arrival then at one of the cities at no great distance, of which some even mention the name, . . . he saw a youth of stalwart frame and winning countenance, and impetuous spirit, and said to the bishop, 'I entrust to thee this youth with all earnestness, calling Christ and the Church to witness.' The bishop accepted the trust, and made all the requisite promises, and the apostle renewed his injunction and adjuration. He then returned to Ephesus, and the elder taking home with him the youth who had been entrusted to his care, maintained, cherished, and finally baptized him. After this he abandoned further care and protection of him, considering that he had affixed to him the seal of the Lord as a perfect amulet against evil. Thus prematurely neglected, the youth was corrupted by certain idle companions of his own age, who were familiar with evil, and who first led him astray by many costly banquets, and then took him out by night with them to share in their felonious proceedings, finally demanding his cooperation in some worse crime. First familiarized with guilt, and then, from the force of his character, starting aside from the straight path like some mighty steed that seizes the bit between its teeth; he rushed towards headlong ruin, and utterly abandoning the divine salvation, gathered his worst comrades around him, and became a most violent, bloodstained, and reckless bandit-chief. Not long afterwards John was recalled to the city, and after putting other things in order said, 'Come now, O bishop, restore to me the deposit which I and the Saviour entrusted to thee, with the witness of the Church over which thou dost preside.' At first the bishop in his alarm mistook the meaning of the metaphor, but the apostle said, 'I demand back the young man and the soul of the brother.' Then groaning from the depth of his heart and shedding tears, 'He is dead,' said the bishop. 'How and by what death?' 'He is dead to God! For he has turned out wicked and desperate, and, to sum up all, a brigand; and now, instead of the Church he has seized the mountain, with followers like himself.' Then the apostle, rending his robe and beating his head, with loud wailing said, 'A fine guardian of our brother's soul did I leave! Give me a horse and a guide.' Instantly, . . . he rode away . . . from the Church and arriving at the brigands' outposts, was captured without flight or resistance, but crying, 'For this I have come. Lead me to your chief.' The chief awaited him in his armour, but when he recognized John as he approached, he was struck with shame and turned to fly [flight]. But John pursued him as fast as he could, forgetful of his age, crying out, 'Why my son, dost thou fly [flee] from thine own father, unarmed, aged as he is? Pity me, . . . fear not . . . stay! believe! Christ sent me.' But he on hearing these words first stood with downcast gaze, then flung away his arms, then trembling, began to weep bitterly, and embraced the old man when he came up to him, pleading with his groans, . . . but the apostle pledging himself . . . led him back to the Church and praying for him . . . and wrestling with him in earnest fastings . . . did not depart, as they say, till he restored him to the bosom of the Church."

Saint Clement of Alexandria (c.150 - c.220)

Source: St. Clement of Alexandria, Quis Divinitus Salv., chapter 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Augustine of Hippo on belief, church, earth, failure, familiarity, fatherhood, men, observation, opposites, saints, theory, water, and world

Though he avoided outright endorsement of the view, fifth-century Church Father Saint Augustine was clearly familiar with the theory of the spherical earth: "They [those who believe that "there are men on the other side of the earth"] fail to observe that even if the world is held to be global or rounded in shape, or if some process of reasoning should prove this to be the case, it would still not necessarily follow that the land on the opposite side is not covered by masses of water."

Saint Augustine of Hippo (354 - 430)

Source: The City of God, 426 A.D.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roger Williams on church and earth

Roger Williams refused to continue as pastor on the grounds that there was . . . " . . . no regularly-constituted church on earth, nor any person authorized to administer any Church ordinance: nor could there be until, new apostles are sent by the great Head of the Church, for whose coming, he is seeking."

Roger Williams (1603? - 1683)

Source: Picturesque America, or the Land We Live In, ed.Wm C Bryant, NY: Appleton Co, 1872, v. 1, p. 502.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robin Morgan on birth, catholicism, celibacy, change, church, control, evil, fear, life, myth, organize, power, religion, and women

Although every organized religion works overtime to contribute its own brand of misogyny to the myth of woman-hate, woman-fear, and woman-evil, the Roman Catholic church also carries the immense power of very directly affecting women's lives everywhere by its stand against birth control and abortion, and by its use of skillful and wealthy lobbies to prevent legislative change. It is an obscenity--an all-male hierarchy, celibate or not, that presumes to rule on the lives and bodies of millions of women.

Robin Morgan (1941 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robertson Davies on books, church, desires, elderly, people, possessions, and secrets

Real bibliophiles do not put their books on shelves for people to look at or handle. They have no desire to show off their darlings, or to amaze people with their possessions. They keep their prized books hidden away in a secret spot to which they resort stealthily, like a Caliph visiting his harem, or a church elder sneaking into a bar. To be a book collector is to combine the worst characteristics of a dope-fiend with those of a miser.

Robertson Davies (1913 - 1995)

Source: The Table Talk of Samuel Marchbanks

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on adversity, beginning, bitterness, charity, christmas, church, clarity, dance, darkness, day, fatherhood, garden, good, home, justice, kindness, life, motherhood, nature, pain, sons, soul, and understanding

Christmas at Sea The sheets were frozen hard, and they cut the naked hand; The decks were like a slide, where a seaman scarce could stand, The wind was a nor'-wester, blowing squally off the sea; And the cliffs and spouting breakers were the only thing a-lee. They heard the surf a-roaring before the break of day; But 'twas only with the peep of light we saw how ill we lay. We tumbled every hand on deck instanter, with a shout, And we gave her the maintops'l, and stood by to go about. All day we tack'd and tack'd between the South Head and the North; All day we haul'd the frozen sheets, and got no further forth; All day as cold as charity, in bitter pain and dread, For very life and nature we tack'd from head to head. We gave the South a wider berth, for there the tide-race roar'd; But every tack we made we brought the North Head close aboard; So's we saw the cliffs and houses, and the breakers running high, And the coastguard in his garden, with his glass against his eye. The frost was on the village roofs as white as ocean foam; The good red fires were burning bright in every 'longshore home; , The windows sparkled clear, and the chimneys volley'd out; And I vow we sniff'd the victuals as the vessel went about. The bells upon the church were rung with a right jovial cheer For it's just that I should tell you how (of all days in the year) This day of our adversity was blessed Christmas morn, And the house above the coastguard's was the house where I was born. O well I saw the pleasant room, the pleasant faces there, My mother's silver spectacles, my father's silver hair; And well I saw the firelight, like a flight of homely elves Go dancing round the china-plates that stand upon the shelves! And well I knew the talk they had, the talk that was of me, Of the shadow on the household and the son that went to sea; And O the wicked fool I seem'd, in every kind of way, To be here and hauling frozen ropes on blessed Christmas Day. They lit the high sea-light, and the dark began to fall. "All hands to loose topgallant sails." I heard the captain call. "By the Lord, she'll never stand it," our first mate Jackson cried. . . . "It's the one way or the other, Mr. Jackson," he replied. She stagger'd to her bearings, but the sails were new and good, And the ship smelt up to windward just as though she understood. As the winter's day was ending, in the entry of the night, We clear'd the weary headland, and pass'd below the light. And they heaved a mighty breath, every soul on board but me, As they saw her nose again pointing handsome out to sea; But all that I could think of, in the darkness and the cold, Was just that I was leaving home and my folks were growing old.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard David Bach on church, country, decisions, evil, good, and parenthood

Good and evil are not what our parents told us, not what our church tells us, or our country, not what anybody else tells us! All of us decide good and evil for ourselves, automatically, by choosing what we want to do!

Richard Bach (1936 -)

Source: Running

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Reinhold Niebuhr on acceptance, change, church, courage, god, grace, popularity, prayer, serenity, and wisdom

God, give us grace to accept with serenity the things that cannot be changed, courage to change the things which should be changed, and the wisdom to distinguish the one from the other. This prayer was first printed in a monthly bulletin of the Federal Council of Churches and has become enormously popular. It has been circulated in millions of copies.

Reinhold Niebuhr (1892 - 1971)

Source: The Serenity Prayer, 1934

Contributed by: Zaady

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