christmas

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on christmas, day, death, despair, earth, failure, familiarity, god, good, men, peace, play, sleep, songs, thought, words, and world

Christmas Bells I heard the bells on Christmas Day Their old, familiar carols play, And wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth, good-will to men! And thought how, as the day had come, The belfries of all Christendom Had rolled along The unbroken song Of peace on earth, good-will to men! Till, ringing, swinging on its way, The world revolved from night to day A voice, a chime, A chant sublime Of peace on earth, good-will to men! Then from each black, accursed mouth The cannon thundered in the South And with the sound The carols drowned Of peace on earth, good-will to men! It was as if an earthquake rent The hearth-stones of a continent, And made forlorn The households born Of peace on earth, good-will to men! And in despair I bowed my head; "There is no peace on earth," I said; "For hate is strong And mocks the song Of peace on earth, good-will to menl" Then pealed the bells more loud and deep, "God is not dead; nor cloth He sleep! The Wrong shall fail, The Right prevail, With peace on earth, good-will to menl"

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Wither on christmas, death, lies, and sorrow

Christmas Pie Lo! now is come our joyfull'st feast! Let every man be jolly; Each room with ivy leaves is dressed, And every post with holly. Now all our neighbours' chimneys smoke, And Christmas blocks are burning; Their ovens they with bakemeats choke, And all their spits are turning. Without the door let sorrow lie, And if for cold it hap to die, We'll bury it in a Christmas pie, And ever more be merry.

George Wither

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by F. Burton Howard on anger, apologies, automobiles, certainty, choice, christmas, cities, clarity, college, confusion, day, decisions, driving, family, fatherhood, good, history, home, jokes, journeys, kiss, laughter, life, losing, mountains, n

When I was in my first year of college at Logan, Utah, I bought an old car for a hundred dollars. I was eighteen and thought that I knew all about driving. It was Christmastime, and my parents were living on a ranch in Wyoming. I picked up my two grandmothers and took them to my parents' home for Christmas. We had a grand time there. When it was time to return to school, the weather had changed and the roads were treacherous. That morning as we were ready to leave, we held a family prayer in the living room. My father prayed that we would have a safe journey. After we had loaded my car with suitcases, blankets, tuna fish sandwiches, and a thermos bottle full of Postum, Dad walked out to the car and said, 'I want to talk to you.' We went over and stood by the fence. 'You have a very valuable cargo,' he said, nodding at my grandmothers. 'I want you to promise me that if the roads are bad and it's snowing when you get down to Lander, you won't go over South Pass. I want you to take the long way.' I promised him that I would. My parents kissed us good-bye, and we were on our way. We had nice weather until we got to Riverton; then it started to snow. By the time we got to Lander, it was snowing pretty hard. I remembered my promise, so when we came to the intersection where you turn to go up the mountain, I made a conscious turn to go the long way. I remember thinking then that it was going to take us five hours longer to get to Utah. I knew the road, and I was absolutely certain that I had made the right turn. As we drove along, we were joking and laughing, although the snow was getting thicker. Then I saw a sign that read, 'Historic Old South Pass City,' and I realized that I had somehow become confused in the snowstorm and had taken the wrong road! I thought, Dad will be angry with me! I don't know how this happened-it wasn't intentional. I had only two choices: I could keep on going, or I could turn around and go back. By this time, we were at the summit, so I decided that we might as well keep going and that I would apologize to Dad later. As we came down the mountain, the snow stopped and the roads were clear. We drove to Logan and then to Malad without any problems. On my way to school the next day I happened to see the front-page headline of a newspaper: WORST BLIZZARD OF THE YEAR STRANDS HUNDREDS IN CENTRAL WYOMING. I bought a paper, and it was full of stories about people who had been stranded, lost, or killed on the road that I had promised to take. I realized that the prayer our family had offered had been answered. I knew that the Lord had gotten us on the right road, and I realized how He had protected us. I was never the same after that.

F. Burton Howard (1933 -)

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ernest R.. on beauty, christmas, communication, experience, family, guests, heart, home, language, mankind, music, silence, songs, surprises, thinking, and time

Music, the universal language of mankind, is also a form of beauty at its best. As language differs among peoples, so does the language of music differ with time, place, background and experience; but if it is true music, it strikes a responsive chord. In a Japanese home at Christmas-time, I was the only person in the group who spoke English. Yet ways of communication were found. Thinking of home, I hummed softly to myself, "Silent Night." To my surprise, the French guest, the German guest and the Japanese family joined in singing the universally inspiring Christmas song, each in his own language, yet in the same language, the language of the heart.

Ernest R..

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Eric G. Anderson on assumptions, christmas, dedication, duty, failure, fear, leadership, learning, life, limits, obligation, responsibility, schools, seriousness, sports, strength, present, and trust

Climbing is a unique sport, presenting mental and physical stress that you learn to overcome by operating close to your limits. Sometimes your limits are higher than you realize. "Of course, you recognize your limits in climbing by falling off the rock," says Alan Czenkusch [leader of Whistepig Climbing School of Del Norte, Colorado]. "However, you're safe because you're on belay." The belay anchor system is the crux of climbing. It allows falls with impunity - almost. The person running the rope does so to protect the climber. There is a great responsibility and obligation to this concept and Czenkusch explains it solemnly. The belayer protects himself by the use of pitons and other devices which give him fail-safe redundant protection. When the belayer calls out to the climber below "On Belay" it means he is set up correctly and has assumed a serious duty and would even give up his own life to protect the climber. Such dedication should allow the person below to ascent with no fear of falling. The mutual trust which allows belaying is part of the camaraderie, the intimacy, the mystique of mountaineering. Belaying has brought Czenkusch his best and worst moments in climbing. Czenkusch once fell from a high precipice, yanking out three mechanical supports and pulling his belayer off a ledge. He was stopped upside down 10 feet from the ground when his spread-eagled belayer arrested the fall with the strength of his outstretched arms. "Don saved my life," says Czenkusch. "How do you respond to a guy like that? Give him a used climbing rope for a Christmas present? No, you remember him. You always remember him."

Eric G. Anderson

Source: “The Vertical Wilderness," Private Practice, Nov. 1979, p. 21.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Della Adams Leitner on age, christmas, heart, needs, past, and sons

The little boy-that-used-to-be On Christmas morning watched the tree. He hid beneath a man's disguise, But oh! the sparkle in his eyes! He watched his son with great delight And how his heart leaped at the sight Of Junior opening up his toys, And then . . . there were two little boys. One half past three, and one . . . oh well, His age in years why need we tell: It did not matter as they played With auto, train and gay parade. Circus and games and toy pop-gun I'm sure I do not know which one Was happier . . . the half past three Or grown-up lad-that-used-to-be.

Della Adams Leitner

Source: Eva Sumner's collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clement Clarke Moore on children, christmas, clothes, dance, day, giving, good, happiness, hope, justice, laughter, obstacles, vision, and work

'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse; The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there; The children were nestled all snug in their beds, While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads; And mamma in her 'kerchief, and I in my cap, Had just settled down for a long winter's nap, When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter, I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter. Away to the window I flew like a flash, Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash. The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below, When, what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny reindeer, With a little old driver, so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick. More rapid than eagles his coursers they came, And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name; "Now, DASHER! now, DANCER! now, PRANCER and VIXEN! On, COMET! on CUPID! on, DONNER and BLITZEN! To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall! Now dash away! dash away! dash away all!" As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly, When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky, So up to the house-top the coursers they flew, With the sleigh full of toys, and St. Nicholas too. And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof The prancing and pawing of each little hoof. As I drew in my hand, and was turning around, Down the chimney St. Nicholas came with a bound. He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot, And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot; A bundle of toys he had flung on his back, And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack. His eyes - how they twinkled! his dimples how merry! His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry! His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow, And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow; The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth, And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath; He had a broad face and a little round belly, That shook, when he laughed like a bowlful of jelly. He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf, And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself; A wink of his eye and a twist of his head, Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread; He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work, And filled all the stockings; then turned with a jerk, And laying his finger aside of his nose, And giving a nod, up the chimney he rose; He sprang to his sleigh, to his team gave a whistle, And away they all flew like the down of a thistle. But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight, "HAPPY CHRISTMAS TO ALL, AND TO ALL A GOOD-NIGHT!"

Clement Clarke Moore (1779 - 1863)

Source: A Visit from St. Nicholas.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on christmas, conscience, and good

A good conscience is a continual Christmas.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Allen Lacy on angels, christmas, jesus, legends, and pity

An angel, legend has it, took pity on a little shepherd girl who had nothing to give to the Infant Jesus in his manger. The angel handed her a weed, but first transformed it into this beautiful flower of winter. [- the Christmas rose, Helleborus niger.]

Allen Lacy

Source: The Gardener's Eye, 1991, p. 14

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Noyes on christmas, day, death, dreams, glory, gold, home, mountains, and songs

The Three Ships As I went up the mountain-side The sea below me glitter'd wide, And, Eastward, far away, I spied On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, The three great ships that take the tide On Christmas Day in the morning. Ye have heard the song, how these must ply From the harbours of home to the ports o' the skyl Do ye dream none knoweth the whither and why On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day The three great ships go sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning? Yet, as I live, I never knew That ever a song could ring so true, Till I saw them break thro' a haze of blue On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the marvellous ancient flags they flew On Christmas Day in the morning! From the heights above the belfried town I saw that the sails were patched and brown, But the 9ags were a-fiame with a great renown On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day, And on every mast was a golden crown On Christmas Day in the morning. Most marvellous ancient ships were these! Were their prows a-plunge to the Chersonese, For the pomp of Rome, or the glory of Greece, On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Were they out on a quest for the Golden Fleece On Christmas Day in the morning? The sun and the wind they told me there How goodly a load the three ships bear, For the first is gold and the second is myrrh On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And the third is frankincense most rare, On Christmas Day in the morning. They have mixed their shrouds with the golden sky, They have faded away where the last dreams die . . . Ah yet, will ye watch, when the mist lifts high On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Will ye see three ships come sailing by On Christmas Day in the morning?

Alfred Noyes (1880 - 1958)

Contributed by: Zaady

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