choice

A Quote by Bruce C. Hafen on choice, control, desires, emptiness, experience, mortality, and weakness

The Savior desires to save us from our inadequacies as well as our sins. Inadequacy is not the same as being sinful - we have far more control over the choice to sin than we may have over our innate capacity. . . . A sense of falling short or falling down is not only natural but essential to the mortal experience. Still, after all we can do, the Atonement can fill that which is empty, straighten our bent parts, and make strong that which is weak.

Bruce C. Hafen (1940 -)

Source: The Broken Heart, p. 19. © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission..

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on belief, choice, clarity, confession, decisions, impossibility, inclusion, language, logic, problems, questions, sharing, truth, virtue, work, and writers

It seems clear that there must be some way of defining logic otherwise than in relation to a particular logical language. The fundamental characteristic of logic, obviously, is that which is indicated when we say that logical propositions are true in virtue of their form. The question of demonstrability cannot enter in, since every proposition which, in one system, is deduced from the premises, might, in another system, be itself taken as a premise. If the proposition is complicated, this is inconvenient, but it cannot be impossible. All the propositions that are demonstrable in any admissible logical system must share with the premises the property of being true in virtue of their form; and all propositions which are true in virtue of their form ought to be included in any adequate logic. Some writers, for example Carnap in his "Logical Syntax of Language," treat the whole matter as being more a matter of linguistic choice than I can believe it to be. In the above mentioned work, Carnap has two logical languages, one of which admits the multiplicative axiom and the axiom of infinity, while the other does not. I cannot myself regard such a matter as one to be decided by our arbitrary choice. It seems to me that these axioms either do, or do not, have the characteristic of formal truth which characterises logic, and that in the former event every logic must include them, while in the latter every logic must exclude them. I confess, however, that I am unable to give any clear account of what is meant by saying that a proposition is "true in virtue of its form." But this phrase, inadequate as it is, points, I think, to the problem which must be solved if an adequate definition of logic is to be found.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: the Introduction to the second edition of The Principles of Mathematics, Russell

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ben Jonson on choice, friendship, happiness, and worth

True happiness consists not in the multitude of friends, but in their worth and choice.

Ben Jonson

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ben Jonson on choice, friendship, happiness, and worth

True happiness Consists not in the multitude of friends But in the worth and choice.

Ben Jonson

Source: Cynthia's Revels, 1600, act III, sc. ii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Barbara Walters on aggression, choice, home, life, women, and work

A woman can do anything. She can be traditionally feminine and that's all right; she can work, she can stay at home; she can be passive; she can be aggressive, she can be any way she wants with a man. But whenever there are the kinds of choices there are today, unless you have some solid base, life can be frightening.

Barbara Walters

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A Quote by Barbara Hambly on choice and learning

...that was the first thing I had to learn about her, and maybe the hardest I've ever learned about anything-that she is her own, and what she gives me is of her choosing, and the more precious because of it. Sometimes a butterfly will come to sit in your open palm, but if you close your hand, one way or the other, it-and its choice to be there-are gone.

Barbara Hambly

Source: Spoken by John Aversin, Dragonsbane

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on choice, desires, destruction, evil, force, men, morality, and sharing

So long as men desire to live together, no man may initiate the use of physical force against others. . . . When a man attempts to deal with me by force, I answer him by force. It is only as retaliation that force may be used and only against the man who starts its use. No, I do not share his evil or sink to his concept of morality: I merely grant him his choice, destruction, the only destruction he had the right to choose: his own.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on achievement, chaos, choice, existence, necessity, power, and world

Every man builds his world in his own image. He has the power to choose, but no power to escape the necessity of choice. If he abdicates his power, he abdicates the status of man, and the grinding chaos of the irrational is what he achieves as his sphere of existence - by his own choice.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: Atlas Shrugged, 1957

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on achievement, certainty, choice, competence, existence, happiness, honesty, independence, integrity, justice, knowledge, life, mind, morality, pride, purpose, reason, rest, self-esteem, and worth

My morality, the morality of reason, is contained in a single axiom: existence exists - and in a single choice: to live. The rest proceeds from these. To live, man must hold three things as the supreme and ruling values of his life: Reason - Purpose - Self-esteem. Reason, as his only tool of knowledge - Purpose, as his choice of the happiness which that tool must proceed to achieve - Self-esteem, as his inviolate certainty that his mind is competent to think and his person is worth of happiness, which means: is worthy of living. These three values imply and require all of man's virtues, and all his virtues pertain to the relation of existence and consciousness: rationality, independence, integrity, honesty, justice, productiveness, pride.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 936)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on achievement, choice, and individuality

For what is the best choice, for each individual is the highest it is possible for him to achieve.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

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